iliotibial band syndrome

(redirected from Illiotibial Band Syndrome)

iliotibial band syndrome

a syndrome of knee pain that may result from inflammation due to mechanical friction of the iliotibial band and the lateral femoral epicondyle.
See also: iliotibial band friction syndrome.

iliotibial band syndrome

Tensor fasciae latae syndrome, TFL syndrome Sports medicine A common running injury, which is the most common cause of lateral knee pain in runners Muscles involved Gluteus maximus, tensor fasciae latae Clinical Lateral knee pain, a quasi-pathognomonic finding, often worse after running, especially after climbing hills or stairs; may be associated with a 'snapping hip', in which muscles crossing the outside of the hip can be felt to snap or click during walking or running Etiology Over-training, attributed to recurrent friction of the iliotibial band sliding over the lateral femoral epicondyle pulling on the lateral insertion near the knee bursa, which becomes inflamed Management Acute phase– ↓ activity, ice massage, NSAIDs, phonophoresis, steroid injections for refractory swelling; rehab–progressive stretching, sprints, gradual ↑ to running distance. See Running.

il·i·o·tib·i·al band fric·tion syn·drome

(il'ē-ō-tib'ē-ăl band frik'shŭn sin'drōm)
A painful condition affecting the hip, thigh, or knee; produced by irritation of the iliotibial tract as it glides over the greater trochanter, anterior superior iliac spine, Gerdy tubercle, or the lateral femoral condyle; sometimes associated with a snapping or grating sensation.
Synonym(s): iliotibial band syndrome.