idiosyncrasy

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idiosyncrasy

 [id″e-o-sing´krah-se]
1. a habit or quality of body or mind peculiar to any individual.
2. an abnormal susceptibility to an agent (e.g., a drug) that is peculiar to the individual. adj., adj idiosyncrat´ic.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-sin'kră-sē), Avoid the misspelling idiosyncracy.
1. A particular mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. In pharmacology, an abnormal reaction to a drug, sometimes specified as genetically determined.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]

idiosyncrasy

(ĭd′ē-ō-sĭng′krə-sē)
n. pl. idiosyncra·sies
1. A structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group.
2. A physiological or temperamental peculiarity.
3. An unusual individual reaction to food or a drug.

id′i·o·syn·crat′ic (-sĭn-krăt′ĭk) adj.
id′i·o·syn·crat′i·cal·ly adv.

idiosyncrasy

Therapeutics A Pt-specific constellation of reactions to a particular drug–eg, insomnia, tremor, weakness, dizziness, or cardiac arrhythmias, which may be seen in some Pts taking adrenergic amines.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-singk'ră-sē)
1. A person's mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. pharmacology An abnormal reaction to a drug, sometimes specified as genetically determined.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]

idiosyncrasy

1. A physiological or mental peculiarity.
2. A tendency to react abnormally to a drug, often in a manner characteristic of the response to a much larger dose than that taken. An individual hypersensitivity to a drug, not of an allergic nature.

Idiosyncrasy

A defect in that particular pathway resulting in an abnormality.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-singk'ră-sē)
1. Particular mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. In pharmacology, abnormal reaction to a drug.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]
References in periodicals archive ?
That includes becoming an expert on the idiosyncracies of the press.
Amaglio attributes these managerial idiosyncracies to "the historical prevalence of banks with strong local entrepreneurs as presidents or individuals selected by political parties, [both of which] have generated, and still generate, a distortion in good corporate governance rules," he criticizes.
Having systematically reviewed and compared the changes that have occurred in those three countries since 1950, the author notes that competition in the international arena has forced each country to develop and take advantage of its economic idiosyncracies, it resources and its own organizational forms.
She has been a colleague who understands the idiosyncracies of individuality ...
Nor are these just idiosyncracies of particular teachers or schools.
Categories that arose during the interviews included idiosyncracies, uncertainty, teaching unique students, best methods to use, doing what the cooperating teacher does, and changing what the cooperating teacher does.
With 1 percent of the country suffering from schizophrenia, most people know someone, or know of someone, who may have manifested some of Weston's idiosyncracies.
A related question which this book raises is whether it is possible for a work to be, for all intents and purposes, culturally irrelevant; whether a work like Shakespeare's Sonnets, for example, might - with its personal idiosyncracies and intensive formal play - be better understood through other interpretative languages.
"We all have our little idiosyncracies," Buckley says.
The present day, because the recording is of very high quality, although some of its idiosyncracies will leave some listeners cold -- particularly those not in tune with the recording philosophies of Pink Floyd, The Beatles, The Who, etc.
Wigder points out that mature companies are almost always less forgiving of personal idiosyncracies. "In a bigger company, talented people--the great engineer with abominable work habits, the great salesman who can't manage other people--may have to leave because the organization isn't flexible enough any more."
His taxonomy of science is imbued with a spirit of common-sense realism and is blessedly free of neologisms and idiosyncracies. By use of an interlocking series of diagrams, he shows how "human nature .