ichthyology

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Related to Ichthyologists: ichthyological

ichthyology

 [ik″the-ol´o-je]
the study of fish.

ichthyology

(ĭk′thē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of zoology that deals with fishes.

ich′thy·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), ich′thy·o·log′i·cal adj.
ich′thy·ol′o·gist n.

ichthyology

(ĭk″thē-ŏl′ō-jē) [″ + logos, word, reason]
The study of fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the ichthyologists's general lack of interest in sharks, in the early twentieth century, a few works on sharks were published that have not been surpassed in usefulness and beauty.
9th Hellenic Congress of Ichthyologists. Messologi, Book of Abstracts (in Greek), Greek Ichthyologists Union.
[Internet] American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.
He published >300 peer-reviewed papers He served numerous professional societies including the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, American Fisheries Association, Texas Academy of Science, Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Desert Fishes Council, and the Southwestern Association of Naturalists.
Zoologists, ornithologists, entomologists and ichthyologists all had a field day, particularly among the 4,000 varieties of termite, and the freshwater fish collection is still being studied 40 years later.
Ichthyologists John Burns and Robert Javonillo (The George Washington University) suggested the use of pancreatin for enzymatic digestion of soft tissues.
This has been achieved largely thanks to the activities of the ichthyologists of the Vortsjarv Limnological Centre.
Perhaps more renowned ichthyologists may have waded in the Wabash River and its major tributaries than in any other North American river.
He delves into taxonomy and molecular biology and has enlisted the help and gained the following of paleontologists, biologists, ecologists, ichthyologists, and other scientists, who provide him clues to the accuracy of his exacting images.
Because both of these fish families belong to the Order Scorpaeniformes, some ichthyologists, Fowler apparently among them, call the entire order "sculpins" in familiar speech, despite it being a rather imprecise moniker.