IVUS


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Related to IVUS: Oct, FFR

IVUS

Intravascular ultrasound, see there.

ultrasound

(ul'tra-sownd?) [ ultra- + sound]
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FETAL ULTRASOUND IMAGE
Inaudible sound in the frequency range of approx. 20,000 to 10 billion (109) cycles/sec. Ultrasound has different velocities that differ in density and elasticity from one kind of tissue to the next. This property permits the use of ultrasound in outlining the shape of various tissues and organs in the body. In obstetrics, for example, identifying the size and position of the fetus, placenta, and umbilical cord enables estimation of gestational age, detects some fetal anomalies and fetal death, and facilitates other diagnostic procedures, e.g., amniocentesis. In physical therapy, the thermal effects of ultrasound are used to treat musculoskeletal injuries by warming tissue, increasing tissue extensibility, and improving local blood flow. Ultrasound is used to facilitate movement of certain medications, e.g., pain relievers, into tissue (phonophoresis). Ultrasound is also used with electric current for muscular stimulation. The diagnostic and therapeutic uses of ultrasound require special equipment. See: illustration; phonophoresis; sonographer; ultrasonography

A-mode ultrasound

In ultrasonography a display in which imaging data are represented as echo amplitudes (on the y-axis) and time (on the x-axis), similar to the way electromagnetic waves are represented on an oscilloscope.
Synonym: A-mode; A-mode (amplitude modulation) display

B-mode ultrasound

In ultrasonography, a display that uses dots of differing intensities to represent echoes received from tissues that more strongly or weakly reflect sound waves.
Synonym: ; B-scan

continuous wave ultrasound

A form of ultrasound used in echocardiography in which a dual crystal transducer continuously generates and receives an ultrasound signal. It is used to measure blood velocities, e.g., across heart valves. A serious shortcoming of continuous wave ultrasound is its inability to identify depth accurately.

continuous wave Doppler ultrasound

Doppler ultrasonography that uses spectral Doppler in a constant series of echoes both originating and being received by the same transducer. It is used to study obstruction to blood flow through vessels.

duplex Doppler ultrasound

Doppler ultrasonography that uses a transducer with two functions: pulsed-wave Doppler and B-mode imaging.

endobronchial ultrasound

Abbreviation: EBUS
The use of ultrasonic transducers carried within a bronchoscope to evaluate tissues in or adjacent to the trachea and bronchi. EBUS can be used to identify solid masses to be biopsied. It helps distinguish solid masses, which may be malignant, from blood vessels such as the aorta or pulmonary arteries, which should not be penetrated with a biopsy needle.

endorectal ultrasound

Abbreviation: ERUS
1. An imaging technique in which an ultrasound transducer is placed inside the rectum and used to evaluate the depth of colon and prostate cancers and the extent to which they have spread to neighboring lymph nodes.
2. Transrectal ultrasound.

endovaginal ultrasound

Transvaginal ultrasonography.

high-intensity focused ultrasound

Abbreviation: HIFU
A noninvasive form of thermotherapy in which ultrasonic energy is used to generate heat for therapeutic purposes within the body. HIFU has been used to cauterize internal blood vessels that are bleeding, to cavitate or coagulate growths or solid malignancies, e.g., breast, liver, pancreatic, or prostate cancers. The ultrasound transducer is placed on the skin and the energy from the transducer is directed at radiographically localized tissue depths and volumes.

interventional ultrasound

The use of ultrasonography as a guide for local injections or for the placement of catheters, needles, or probes into body cavities or tumors. Interventional ultrasound is used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, prostate cancer, and other solid tumors.

intravascular ultrasound

Abbreviation: IVUS
In ultrasonography, a technique for imaging intimal tissue proliferation and blood vessel blockages.

keepsake fetal ultrasound

A colloquialism for a three-dimensional image of an unborn child visualized in the womb with ultrasonography treated as a memento. The image is kept by expectant parents as part of a scrapbook of pregnancy and anticipated childbirth.

M-mode ultrasound

An ultrasonic display mode in which the motion of structures is seen on the vertical axis of the display, used, e.g., to show the movement of the heart's valves and walls during diastole and systole.
Synonym: motion-mode display; time-motion mode ultrasound

pelvic ultrasound

Examination of the pelvis with an ultrasonic transducer placed inside the vagina. It is used in assessment of diseases or conditions affecting the cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, or ovaries.
Synonym: endovaginal ultrasound.

pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound, pulsed Doppler ultrasound

quantitative ultrasound

Abbreviation: QUS
Measurement of the density of a body tissue, e.g., bone, by determining how rapidly sound travels through the tissue and how different sonic wavelengths are absorbed. QUS is used to diagnose osteopenia and osteoporosis.

real-time ultrasound

A sonographic procedure that provides rapid, multiple images of an anatomical structure in the form of motion.

time-motion mode ultrasound

M-mode ultrasound.

transrectal ultrasound

Abbreviation: TRUS
Imaging of the prostate gland and periprostatic tissues with an ultrasound transducer inserted into the anus and directed toward the anterior rectum. It is used to identify malignant tumors, guide biopsies, and provide assessments of tumor staging.
Synonym: endorectal ultrasound (2)

intravascular ultrasound

Abbreviation: IVUS
In ultrasonography, a technique for imaging intimal tissue proliferation and blood vessel blockages.
See also: ultrasound
References in periodicals archive ?
Although IVUS and FFR have long been available to augment angiography, legacy systems were cumbersome, and access to these systems was too limited to drive broader acceptance.
Hodgson continued, "The combination of more complex target lesions, concerns about late stent thrombosis, the launch of new faster, integrated IVUS and FFR technologies, and the growing awareness that angiography does not tell the whole story, has driven IVUS use dramatically higher in recent years.
Since any integrated IVUS solution interacts at some level with the x-ray imaging system, it's critical that the IVUS system has established compatibility with x-ray system vendors.
The Volcano Bedside Touchpad Controller is designed to operate beneath a sterile drape, allowing the physician to record IVUS runs, toggle between the different VH(TM) IVUS or ChromaFlo(R) functionality, confirm vessel and lumen borders and make detailed manual measurements without having to leave the sterile field.
InfraReDx's LipiScan[TM] IVUS Coronary Imaging System includes the first and only available catheter to combine both near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) technologies to both visualize and characterize the intracoronary lipid core plaques (LCP) demonstrated to complicate stenting and suspected of causing the majority of heart attacks.
Increase Market Share in Existing IVUS & FM Markets
IVUS Catheter Usage - Comparison of Japan & Korea
Additionally, GE and Volcano today announced GE's plans to include the cabling required to operate Volcano's IVUS technology on all future U.
Our decision to include IVUS cabling in all future U.
With more than 1,200 Innova all-digital x-ray systems installed worldwide, GE is poised to facilitate greater utilization of IVUS to further guide patient management.
Volcano Therapeutics recently acquired the IVUS and coronary physiology measurement business units of JOMED NV.
IVUS also has shown promise for avoiding over-radiation of tissues, which the Cleveland Clinic researchers believe is responsible for causing tissue necrosis, which in turn leads to platelet aggregation and thrombosis.