ITP


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purpura

 [per´pu-rah]
a hemorrhagic disease characterized by extravasation of blood into the tissues, under the skin, and through the mucous membranes, and producing spontaneous bruises, ecchymoses, and petechiae (small hemorrhagic spots) on the skin. (See plate in Dermatology Atlas.) When accompanied by a decrease in the circulating platelets, it is called thrombocytopenic purpura; when there is no decrease in the platelet count, it is called nonthrombocytopenic purpura. adj., adj purpu´ric.

There are two general types of thrombocytopenic purpura: primary or idiopathic, in which the cause is unknown, and secondary or symptomatic, which may be associated with exposure to drugs or other chemical agents, systemic diseases such as multiple myeloma and leukemia, diseases affecting the bone marrow or spleen, and infectious diseases such as rubella (German measles).
Symptoms. The outward manifestations and laboratory findings of primary and secondary thrombocytopenic purpura are similar. There is evidence of bleeding under the skin, with easy bruising and the development of petechiae. In the acute form there may be bleeding from any of the body orifices, such as hematuria, nosebleed, vaginal bleeding, and bleeding gums. The platelet count is below 100,000 per cubic millimeter of blood and may go as low as 10,000 per cubic millimeter (normal count is about 250,000 per cubic millimeter). The bleeding time is prolonged and clot retraction is poor. Coagulation time is normal.
Treatment. Differential diagnosis is necessary to determine the type of purpura present and to eliminate the cause if it can be determined. General measures include protection of the patient from trauma, elective surgery, and tooth extractions, any one of which may lead to severe or even fatal hemorrhage. In the thrombocytopenic form, corticosteroids may be administered when the purpura is moderately severe and of short duration. Splenectomy is indicated when other, more conservative measures fail and is successful in a majority of cases. In some instances, especially in children, there may be spontaneous and permanent recovery from idiopathic purpura. (See Atlas 2, Part Q.)
allergic purpura (anaphylactoid purpura) Henoch-Schönlein purpura.
annular telangiectatic purpura a rare form in which pinpoint reddened lesions coalesce to form a ring-shaped or continuously linked pattern, commonly beginning in the lower extremities and becoming generalized. Called also Majocchi's disease.
fibrinolytic purpura purpura associated with increased fibrinolytic activity of the blood.
purpura ful´minans a form of nonthrombocytopenic purpura seen mainly in children, usually after an infectious disease, marked by fever, shock, anemia, and sudden, rapidly spreading symmetrical skin hemorrhages of the lower limbs, often associated with extensive intravascular thromboses and gangrene.
purpura hemorrha´gica primary thrombocytopenic purpura.
Henoch's purpura a type of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in which abdominal symptoms predominate.
Henoch-Schönlein purpura a type of nonthrombocytopenic purpura, of unknown cause but thought to be due to a vasculitis; it is most often seen in children and is associated with clinical symptoms such as urticaria and erythema, arthritis and other joint diseases, gastrointestinal symptoms, and renal involvement. Called also Schönlein-Henoch purpura or syndrome and allergic or anaphylactoid purpura.
idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura thrombocytopenic purpura not directly associated with any definable systemic disease, although it often follows a systemic infection; the cause is thought to be an IgG immunoglobulin that acts as an antibody against platelets, causing ecchymoses, petechiae, and other bleeding. There are both acute and chronic forms: the acute form has a sudden onset, is more common in children, and usually resolves spontaneously within a few months; the chronic form has a slower onset, is more common in adults, and may be recurrent.
nonthrombocytopenic purpura purpura without any decrease in the platelet count of the blood. In such cases the cause is either abnormal capillary fragility or a clotting factor deficiency.
Schönlein purpura a type of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in which articular systems predominate; called also Schönlein's disease.
Schönlein-Henoch purpura Henoch-Schönlein purpura.
purpura seni´lis dark purplish red ecchymoses occurring on the forearms and backs of the hands in the elderly.
thrombocytopenic purpura purpura associated with a decrease in the number of platelets in the blood; see purpura.
thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura a form of thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, bizarre neurological manifestations, uremia (azotemia), fever, and thromboses in terminal arterioles and capillaries; some authorities consider it identical to the hemolytic uremic syndrome. Called also microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and Moschcowitz's disease.

ITP

ITP

Abbreviation for:
idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura
immune thrombocytopaenic purpura
individualised treatment plan
innovative training post
inosine triphosphate
intrathoracic pressure
intratracheal pressure

ITP

Idiopathic, aka immune, thrombocytopenic purpura, see there.

ITP

Abbreviation for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura;
inosine 5'-triphosphate.

Immune or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

A blood disease that results in destruction of platelets, which are blood cells involved in clotting.
Mentioned in: Splenectomy

ITP

Abbreviation for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through discipline on roads, the image of ITP force would be good before the guests and also in the public, he added.
Last month, ITP announced the close of its fourth technology fund, ITP Fund IV, a $400m pool, in excess of its target having received strong support from a diverse group of global blue-chip institutional investors.
First line drugs therapy includes oral corticosteroids (2mg/kg/day) for two weeks followed by tapering over one week or intravenous methylprednisolone (30mg/kg for 3 days) or a single dose of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (0.8-1g/kg) or intravenous Rhesus anti-D (50-75 ug/kg).1 The objective of our study was to demonstrate the pattern of clinical presentation of paediatric patients of newly diagnosed ITP and to document its outcome in our centre.
In the group of ITP patients, for two of them (2/32; 6.3%), a diagnosis of CD was made before the study period; the remaining 30 patients were investigated for asymptomatic CD and new cases of CD were not found.
Smoking can cause significant increase in the platelet aggregability in ITP patients.
Together with an initial proof of concept study, the NDA included 163 ITP patients.
In recent studies, an effort has been made to determine the predictive parameters based on the new classification in which the time limit for chronic ITP is 12 months [12-14].
The approval expands treatment options for paediatric patients aged one year and above with chronic ITP who have not responded to other therapies.
Her history revealed that the case had irregularly been followed up depending on ITP for three years.
Islamabad Traffic Police (ITP) has become model of excellence through its service-oriented policies and further endeavoring to come up to the expectations of the general public by ensuring traffic discipline in the city.
ITP is a joint venture between Rolls-Royce (46.9%) and a subsidiary of Sener (53.1%).
New York, NY, February 28, 2014 --(PR.com)-- ITP VoIP, healthcare marketing's fastest growing VoIP service company, continues its success by launching a contest to provide their existing and potential customers with a chance at a full free year of phone service, http://itpvoip.com/.