IPF


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IPF

IPF

Abbreviation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

fraction

(frak'shon) [L. fractio, act of breaking]
1. In biological chemistry, the separable part of a substance such as blood or plasma.
2. The ratio of a component to the total, e.g., the substance fraction of carboxyhemoglobin (relative to the total hemoglobin).

attributable fraction

The percentage of instances of an illness that can be accounted for by a particular risk factor. For example, people exposed to asbestos have a certain risk of developing lung cancer, and if they also smoke tobacco, they are also at risk from that factor. These risks may be estimated from cohort studies.
Synonym: additional risk; attributable risk

carboxyhemoglobin fraction

The percentage of total hemoglobin in a blood sample that is covalently bonded to carbon monoxide.

ejection fraction

Abbreviation: EF
In cardiac physiology, the percentage of the blood emptied from the ventricle during systole. The left ventricular ejection fraction averages 60% to 70% in healthy hearts but can be markedly reduced if part of the heart muscle dies (as after myocardial infarction) or in cardiomyopathy or valvular heart disease.

immature platelet fraction

Abbreviation: IPF
The percent of platelets found in the circulating blood that still retains RNA. It is elevated (greater than 12%) in diseases in which platelets are rapidly destroyed after their release from the bone marrow, e.g., disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). These diseases can be distinguished from other thrombocytopenic conditions in which platelet regeneration is slower, e.g., aplastic anemia, liver failure, or kidney failure, because the IPF is usually less than 12% in diseases characterized by bone marrow inactivity or suppression. The IPF is determined using flow cytometry.

fraction of inspired oxygen

Abbreviation: Fio2
The concentration of oxygen in the inspired air, esp. that supplied as supplemental oxygen by mask or catheter.

mass fraction

The ratio of the mass of a constituent to the total mass of the system in which the constituent is contained.

methemoglobin fraction

The fraction of the hemoglobin in the blood in which ferrous iron has been oxidized to ferric iron.

oxyhemoglobin fraction

F O2Hb
That portion of hemoglobin present in a sample of blood that is reversibly bound to oxygen.

plasma protein fraction

A standard sterile preparation of serum albumin and globulin obtained by fractionating blood, serum, or plasma from healthy human donors and testing for absence of hepatitis B surface antigen. It is used as a blood volume expander.

substance fraction

The ratio of the amount (number of moles or entities) of a constituent of a mixture to the total of constituents of the system.
See: mass fraction

volume fraction

The ratio of the volume of a constituent to the volume of the whole. In practice, it may be difficult to determine the volume fraction because differences in the molecular sizes of the constituents may produce a total volume that differs from the sum of the individual volumes of the mixture. When materials of similar physicochemical characteristics (such as multiple aqueous solutions) are combined, this is not a problem.

immature platelet fraction

Abbreviation: IPF
The percent of platelets found in the circulating blood that still retains RNA. It is elevated (greater than 12%) in diseases in which platelets are rapidly destroyed after their release from the bone marrow, e.g., disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). These diseases can be distinguished from other thrombocytopenic conditions in which platelet regeneration is slower, e.g., aplastic anemia, liver failure, or kidney failure, because the IPF is usually less than 12% in diseases characterized by bone marrow inactivity or suppression. The IPF is determined using flow cytometry.
See also: fraction
References in periodicals archive ?
The two main symptoms of IPF are breathlessness and chronic cough.
Table-3: Comparison of Characteristics of IPF and other ILDs.
Dr Ben Hope-Gill, a specialist lung consultant at University Hospital Llandough, added: "As someone who regularly cares for people with IPF, I am thrilled that the British Lung Foundation is continuing to invest so much to help research better understanding of the condition and treatments.
The IPF epidemiology report is written and developed by Masters- and PhD-level epidemiologists.
11-13 The sensitivity and specificity of IPF has previously been reported to be 91-96% and 67-100%, respectively.
On the other hand, thrombocytopenic samples with higher than normal IPF are often consistent with platelet destruction disorders like immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), the effect of drugs or other causes.
Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum levels of MMP-7 are significantly higher in patients with IPF compared with those in healthy subjects [11].
Some 97 foreign companies from 25 countries participated in IPF 2015 which shows an increase of 120 percent compared to IPF 2014.
There was no evidence that NAC slowed the progression of IPF or improved lung function, as measured by forced vital capacity, compared to placebo," says lead author Fernando Martinez, executive vice chair of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.
1) Digital clubbing is found more commonly in IPF (25 - 66%) than iNSIP (8%).
To date, no study has investigated the knowledge and behaviour relating to IPF in male youth football.
with IPF across the country made huge efforts, both locally and nationally, to rally up support and ILFA would especially like to thank them for their determination, persistence and tenacity.