FABP2

(redirected from I-FABP)

FABP2

A gene on chromosome 4q28-q31 that encodes an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that binds saturated long-chain fatty acids and is thought to play a role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein synthesis. FABP2 may also help maintain energy homeostasis by acting as a lipid sensor; it is induced by EGF.
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Furthermore, a series study of urinary intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) for predicting strangulated mechanical small bowel obstruction showed that it was a reliable marker for SSBO, but the sample size was small.
In order to improve the diagnosis of SSBO, this score can also be combined with other laboratory makers, such as C-reactive protein, and I-FABP, if the condition permits.
Interestingly, a recent study showed a significant increase in intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) levels in full term infants with stage I NEC, as well as a correlation with the disease's severity [11].
Similarly, I-FABP (intestinal fatty acid-binding protein) is considered a marker for intestinal damage, such as in necrotizing enterocolitis (12).
Studies in animal models of neonatal asphyxia, hypoxia, ischemia/reperfusion and NEC show changes in the expression of caspase-3 and I-FABP markers (12,13).
Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) is a 15-kDa cytoplasmic protein located in small intestinal enterocytes involved in the uptake and transport of polar lipids such as fatty acids from the small-bowel lumen, which has been associated with injury to the intestinal mucosa and injury common to inflammatory bowel diseases.6 When the integrity of the enterocyte membrane is compromised, I-FABP are rapidly released into the circulation.
While L-FABP is known to bind FA with high affinity, in recent reports we have shown that both L- and I-FABP can specifically bind a structurally diverse set of non-FA lipophilic drugs [25-29].
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether serum levels of intestinal type fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) are related to intestinal ischemia in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery.
Two types of fatty acid binding protein (FABP) are found in intestinal epithelium, intestinal FABP (I-FABP) and liver FABP (L-FABP) (Banaszak et al., 1994).
In line with our results, data from previous studies have shown that several members of the FABP family, including H-FABP (33), L-FABP (34), intestine-type FABP (I-FABP) (35), and brain-type FABP (B-FABP) (36), are present in the human bloodstream, presumably being released from the cells via direct diffusion.
Human I-FABP is a 132 amino acid 15.2 kDa cytoplasmic protein that is highly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells.
Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) is a valuable marker for epithelial damage of the intestine and, therefore, for mesenteric ischemia.