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id

 [id]
a freudian term used to describe that part of the personality which harbors the unconscious, instinctive impulses that lead to immediate gratification of primitive needs such as hunger, the need for air, the need to move about and relieve body tension, and the need to eliminate. Id impulses are physiologic and body processes, as opposed to the ego and superego, which are psychologic and social processes. The id is dominated by the pleasure principle and some gratification of the id impulses is necessary for survival of a person's personality.
id reaction a localized or generalized, sterile secondary skin eruption occurring in sensitized patients as a result of circulation of allergenic products from a primary site of infection; the morphology and site of the lesion vary.

ID

Abbreviation for infecting (or infective) dose. See: minimal infecting dose.

id

(id),
1. In psychoanalysis, one of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and superego. It is completely in the unconscious realm, is unorganized, is the reservoir of psychic energy or libido, and is under the influence of the primary processes.
2. The total of all psychic energy available from the innate biologic hungers, appetites, bodily needs, drives, and impulses, in a newborn infant; through socialization this diffuse undirected energy becomes channeled in less egocentric and more socially responsive directions (development of the ego from the id).
[L. id, that]

id

(ĭd)
n.
In Freudian theory, the division of the psyche that is totally unconscious and serves as the source of instinctual impulses and demands for immediate satisfaction of primitive needs.

id

In psychoanalysis, the set of uncoordinated instincts which are the source of unconscious and primitive urges and desires in humans.

id

Psychiatry The unconscious source–per the freudian construct of mental energies, libido, unstructured desires and drives. See Ego, Superego. Cf Id reaction.

id

(id)
1. psychoanalysis One of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and superego. It is completely in the unconscious realm, is unorganized, is the reservoir of psychic energy or libido, and is under the influence of the primary processes.
2. The total of all psychic energy available from the innate biologic hungers, appetites, bodily needs, drives, and impulses in a newborn infant.
[L. id, that]

id

A Freudian term for that primitive part of our nature concerned with the pursuit of mainly physical and sexual gratification and unmoved by considerations of reason, logic or humanity. The id manifests the forces of the libido and the death wish, but is said to be the source of much of our psychic energy. Freud's choice of the term may have been a little prudish in its lack of specificity; id is a Latin rendering of the Greek es meaning it. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

id

(id)
In psychoanalysis, one of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and superego. It is completely in the unconscious realm, is unorganized, is the reservoir of psychic energy or libido, and is under the influence of the primary processes.
[L. id, that]
References in classic literature ?
"I could have made it much more flowery if I'd had a little more time to think it over."
I'd forgotten it, but I felt a prayer should be finished off in some way, so I put in the other.
When I couldn't see, or feel, an' when my knees was shakin an my head goin' like a merry-go-round, I'd fall safe into clenches just the same.
And I'd have you know, sir, you must ha' done with 'em," said the Squire, frowning and casting an angry glance at his son.
"It's like as if I'd come out o' make believe, o' purpose to show 'em you," said Bob, with an air of discontent, as Maggie gave him the bag again, "a-taking 'em back i' this way.
And when I'd put it there, I thought I should like somebody to find it and save it from dying; but when I saw it was gone, I was struck like a stone, with fear.
I was a-trembling, because I'd got to de- cide, forever, betwixt two things, and I knowed it.
And there was something about him--he said I'd never regret it, he promised to give me seven pounds a week--he said he was earning fifteen, and it was all a lie, he wasn't.
"Well, first, I only came across a letter Monty wrote with the address of those lawyers a few days ago, and, secondly, the Bekwando Mine and Land Company has only just boomed, and you see that made me feel that I'd like to give a lift up to any one belonging to poor old Monty I could find.
But let me tell you right not that I'm worth the devil alone knows how many millions, and that I'd sure give it all, right here on the bar, to turn down your hand.
I'd have a stable full of Arabian steeds, rooms piled high with books, and I'd write out of a magic inkstand, so that my works should be as famous as Laurie's music.
I'd LIKE a home--jest a common one, ye know, with a mother in it, instead of a Matron.