hysteresis

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hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
References in periodicals archive ?
The digital filter over-samples and applies hysterisis to the data to remove glitches, spurious noise and account for jitter.
price/exchange rate relationship may be more subject to hysterisis than other economies, which may bias the results [3; 20].
This is because, under the assumptions of fixed real government expenditure and nominal interest rates, the price level in the model has hysterisis properties.
Hysterisis, creep, delamination and rusting can become cumulative losses that mean the difference between excellent reception and marginal reception.
As the temperature decreased both the apparent loading modulus and strength increase, but the samples recover their original dimensions upon unloading, the unloading curve exhibits some hysterisis but unloads to near zero load for all temperatures and strain rates.
Both measurements of phase inversion in the middle of the pipe and at the wall showed very few differences between the o/w [right arrow] w/o and w/o [right arrow] o/w inversion routes (Figures 3 and 5), suggesting that there is no hysterisis effect (or ambivalent range) in the current pipeline system.
The resolution of the optical system is well within mobile equipment industry standards and there is no deadband on either end of the sensing range, the company said, along with no measurable hysterisis. It is also fully ruggedized for application in mobile equipment, according to Parker.
A more quantitative measure of this is obtained by measuring the permanent set in a 200% cyclic elongation hysterisis cycle, measured after a test conducted at 25.4 cm/min.