hysteresis

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Related to Hysteresis losses: Eddy current

hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Specific losses of soft ferromagnetic materials include hysteresis losses, eddy losses and excess losses.
According to [10], hysteresis losses in a polarized magnet can be significant specially, when slot harmonics in the machine is high.
Eddy currents and hysteresis losses are negligible and the induced EMF is sinusoidal.
As we have seen in paragraphs concerning suspension, shock absorbers create heat as they absorb mechanical energy, while hysteresis losses in rubber components such as tires and rubber-bushed and rubber-padded tracks all generate heat energy.
The TG3600 series half-horsepower slotless brushless DC servo motor uses a winding technology without wire windings that eliminates eddy current, hysteresis losses and cogging.
However, the higher moduli are not accompanied by a significant drop in strain behavior or higher hysteresis losses. Both elongation at break and loss factor (tan [delta]) are on a comparable level.
To generate heat in an alternating field, magnetic materials activate more than four different known mechanisms, which are generation of eddy currents, hysteresis losses, relaxation losses, and frictional losses, and so forth.