hysteresis

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hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The output responses evaluated included the cell nucleation density, bulk density, compression hysteresis loss, Shore A hardness, and tensile strength.
In [10,24,29] hysteresis losses in synchronous machines were studied based on a combination of measurements and FE results.
Lesser damping entails reduced values of hysteresis loss. The hysteresis measurements also evidenced lesser values of hysteresis loss in FGPCs.
The hysteresis loss of silicone rubber compound does not change appreciably on incorporation of SVP.
As given in Table 5, the 1,12-DDL component makes the permanent set unfavorably increase and the hysteresis loss slightly high.
It is observed that with an increase in peroxide dose, the tensile strength, modulus and hardness gradually increase while the tension set and hysteresis loss ratio decrease.
But the low hysteresis loss is only one of the major advantages that can be obtained with this new silane.
It is likely that these vulcanizates undergo viscous dissipation, resulting in higher hysteresis loss. The corresponding energy, thus, is not translated in terms of formation of new surface, i.e., flex cracking.
Hysteresis loss in a material is a measure of the energy dissipated by various processes.
Here, the compounds display improved tear resistance, low hysteresis loss and low electrical conductivity.
However, the quantitative evaluation of hysteresis loss, which is defined as the measure of energy dissipated during cyclic deformation of rubber, has not been done.
"Hysteresis loss of rubber vulcanizates: Development of dimensionless parameters," K.K.