hysteresis

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hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cumming and Croft (1973) studied the hysteresis effect under laboratory conditions using a number shadowing task.
On the other hand we found no support for insider hysteresis effects since the estimates of employment changes were insignificantly determined and often incorrectly signed.
A positive depreciation rate on the hysteresis effect can have a sizable effect on their calculations.
Without an applied field, the hysteresis effects with increasing and decreasing temperature are minimal.
The size of hysteresis effects will clearly be potentially much larger if the FEER adjustment is required to be big enough to repay the debt incurred rather than simply to service the additional interest obligation.
The main reasons for the hysteresis effect of Bayer red mud significantly larger than that of sintering red mud are as follows: (1) The sintering red mud contains vast cement hydraulic cementing minerals and calcites, and the cementation enables the particles to cement together and form the macroporous aerial structure.
The hysteresis effect indicates that certain conditions increase organizational inertia; therefore, firms will engage in counterintuitive behavior such as continued investment following negative feedback (Bragger et al.
In the early period of this stage, the horizontal displacement continued the trend of accelerated increase due to the hysteresis effect of seepage field that groundwater variation lags behind reservoir level.
Through this figure, it can be observed that equilibrium moisture content values obtained by desorption are higher than those obtained by adsorption, denoting the hysteresis effect in the temperature range studied.
Such a hysteresis effect can be explained by the existence of bistable potential well inside the gas discharge device.
It is not easy to quantify these "hysteresis effects," in part because the factors that cause a downturn may continue to have an impact once the downturn has ended, which is difficult to disentangle from the hysteresis effect.