hysteresis

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Related to Hysteresis effect: Hysteresis loss

hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis

/hys·te·re·sis/ (his″tĕ-re´sis) [Gr.]
1. a time lag in the occurrence of two associated phenomena, as between cause and effect.
2. in cardiac pacemaker terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing.

hysteresis

[his′tərē′sis]
Etymology: Gk, hysterein, to be late
1 a lagging or retardation of one of two associated phenomena or a failure to act in unison.
2 the influence of the previous condition or treatment of the body on its subsequent response to a given force, as in the elastic property of a lung. At any given lung volume the elastic recoil pressure within the airways during expiration is less than that which exists at the same lung volume during inspiration.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis

the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
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The hysteresis effect indicates that certain conditions increase organizational inertia; therefore, firms will engage in counterintuitive behavior such as continued investment following negative feedback (Bragger et al.
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Moreover, to an extent that is greatly underappreciated in the policy debate, short-run increases in demand and output would have medium- to long-term benefits as the economy reaps the benefits of what economists call hysteresis effects.
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This paper aims to trace different transmission channels of the hysteresis effects associated with fiscal deficit in the macro dynamics of the economy.
Developers with the means to fully understand the improvements that electrical steels can make, as well as to explore mechanical design ideas that minimize hysteresis effects.
0]H) and magnetic moment (M) form the work term in Equation 1 hysteresis effects are ignored (Guggenheim 1967).