hypovolemia

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Related to Hypovolaemic shock: obstructive shock, cardiogenic shock, distributive shock, hemorrhagic shock

hypovolemia

 [hi″po-vo-le´me-ah]
abnormally decreased volume of circulating blood in the body; see also hypovolemic shock. adj., adj hypovole´mic.

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vō-lē'mē-ă), Do not confuse this word with hypovolia.
A decreased amount of blood in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

hypovolemia

/hy·po·vo·le·mia/ (-vōl-ēm´e-ah) diminished volume of circulating blood in the body.hypovole´mic

hypovolemia

[-vōlē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hypo + L, volumen, whirl; Gk, haima, blood
an abnormally low circulating blood volume. Also spelled hypovolaemia. hypovolemic, adj.

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vŏ-lē'mē-ă)
A decreased amount of blood volume in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia, hypovolaemia.
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

hypovolemia

abnormally decreased volume of circulating fluid (plasma) in the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 Final cause of death Circulatory system 486 Hypovolaemic shock 279 Septic shock 207 Respiratory failure 595 Cardiac failure 298 Pulmonary oedema 113 Cardiac arrest 185 Acute collapse due to embolism 38 CSs, n CFR for CS delivery only, /10 000 CSs Primary obstetric cause of death Non-pregnancy-related infections 166 2.
Final and contributory causes of maternal deaths for hypertension and a comparison with 2005-2007 and 2002-2004 2005-2007 2002-2004 Organ system N % N % Hypovolaemic shock 50 8.
Systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent spontaneous episodes of hypovolaemic shock due to marked plasma shifts from the intravascular to the extravascular space.
A capillary leak syndrome was considered on the basis of severe hypovolaemic shock, oedema, haemoconcentration, and low albumin level.
SCLS is a disease characterized by spontaneous recurrent episodes of hypovolaemic shock due to extravasation of plasma resulting from altered capillary permeability.
Most aneurysms rupture into the retroperitoneal space and patients present with the classic triad of sudden onset, severe abdominal and/or back pain, circulatory collapse due to hypovolaemic shock and a pulsatile, tender abdominal mass.
An hour after the procedure he developed sudden abdominal pain, vomiting and hypovolaemic shock with signs of generalised peritonitis.