hypnotic

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hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

/hyp·not·ic/ (hip-not´ik)
1. inducing sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

[hipnot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypnos, sleep
one of a class of drugs often used as sedatives. See also hypnagogue.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic (hipnot´ik),

n 1. a drug that induces sleep or depresses the central nervous system at a cortical level.
adj 2. causing sleep or a trance. See also sedative.

hypnotic

1. pertaining to or inducing hypnosis or sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
One cyclopyrrolone, eszopiclone (Lunesta), has been in use in Europe since 1992; the FDA approved its use as a hypnotic in 2005 in the United States.
Still, they asserted that the findings raise concerns about the use of hypnotics.
Lader of King's College London, examined 10 years' of antidepressant and hypnotic prescribing records contained in the DIN-LINK Database, which contains prescription records for more
6) Although benzodiazepines increase sleep time and efficiency, patients quickly develop tolerance to the hypnotic effects.
Although consistent in identifying elderly people as the group most likely to report disturbed sleep and hypnotic drug use [9], these have provided few insights into the incidence of, or outcomes associated with, insomnia in later life.
A third cyclopyrrolone is eszopiclone (Lunesta) has been in use in Europe since 1992; the FDA approved its use as a hypnotic in 2005 in the United States.
What I want to emphasize, given the fact that these people were withdrawing from their hypnotics, is that on no self-reported sleep measure did we get a significant deterioration in sleep over the course of drug withdrawal," he said.
DENVER -- The conventional wisdom holding that prescribing hypnotic agents for nursing home patients increases their risk of falling and hip fracture may not be correct.
On informal inspection, we became aware of excessive prescribing of hypnotics to in-patients.
The withdrawal syndrome from the sedative hypnotics is similar for all members of the class and differs only in severity and temporal onset in the signs and symptoms.
Drug classes covered: antidepressants, antipsychotics, psychostimulants, hypnotics, sedatives, and anxiolytics.