hypnotic

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hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

/hyp·not·ic/ (hip-not´ik)
1. inducing sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

[hipnot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypnos, sleep
one of a class of drugs often used as sedatives. See also hypnagogue.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic (hipnot´ik),

n 1. a drug that induces sleep or depresses the central nervous system at a cortical level.
adj 2. causing sleep or a trance. See also sedative.

hypnotic

1. pertaining to or inducing hypnosis or sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
One cyclopyrrolone, eszopiclone (Lunesta), has been in use in Europe since 1992; the FDA approved its use as a hypnotic in 2005 in the United States.
Hypnotic drugs are associated with a more than threefold increase in the risk of death, even when prescribed in limited quantities, according to findings from a large matched cohort study.
Lader of King's College London, examined 10 years' of antidepressant and hypnotic prescribing records contained in the DIN-LINK Database, which contains prescription records for more
A program of gradual weaning was chosen as the comparator arm because it's the standard therapy available today to patients who present to their physicians asking for help in getting off hypnotic drugs.
It was stated in the article, but somewhat lost in the media frenzy that followed, that many patients with these episodes of sleep driving had taken the hypnotic incorrectly or mixed it with alcohol.
The other reason has been the concern that a hypnotic agent might actually make the depression worse, based on epidemiologic data involving benzodiazepines.
A recent study involving more than 34,000 Michigan nursing home residents suggests an alternative explanation: The increased risk of falls may be attributable to the insomnia for which hypnotic agents are so often prescribed, rather than to the drugs themselves, W.
DENVER -- The conventional wisdom holding that prescribing hypnotic agents for nursing home patients increases their risk of falling and hip fracture may not be correct.
Usually around 10% to 15% of those who use hypnotics take them for a year or longer.
In contrast, 36% of patients who fell had received other sedative hypnotics within the previous 24 hours, compared with 25% of controls.
Unlike other sedative hypnotics, diphenhydramine is not associated with an increased risk of falls in hospitalized patients, Dr.