hypnotic

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hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]
References in periodicals archive ?
Persons Reporting Prescriptions for 10 Leading Psychiatric Drugs (a) Drug Name Mechanism Rank (Brand Name) of Action 1 Sertraline hydrochlolride SSRI (Zoloft) antidepressant 2 Citalopram hydrobromide SSRI (Celexa) antidepressant 3 Alprazolam (Xanax) Benzodiazepine 4 Zolpidem tartrate (Ambien) Hypnotic 5 Fluoxetine hydrochloride SSRI (Prozac) antidepressant 6 Trazodone hydrochloride SARI (Desyrel) antidepressant 7 Clonazepam (Klonopin) Benzodiazepine 8 Lorazepam (Ativan) Benzodiazepine 9 Escitalopram oxalate SSRI (Lexapro) antidepressant 10 Duloxetine hydrochloride SNRI (Cymbalta) antidepressant Reported Use, Prescriptions per Rank No.
This study aimed to describe dental prescriptions of anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics for Brazilian outpatients in 2010.
Hypnotic should be used judiciously for short periods only.
In 1993, zaleplon (Sonata) was the first pyrazolopyrimidine investigated for clinical use as a hypnotic. The FDA approved its use in 1999.
Still, they asserted that the findings raise concerns about the use of hypnotics.
Rates of new cancers were 35 percent higher among patients who were prescribed at least 132 hypnotic doses a year as compared with those who did not take the drugs.
Lader of King's College London, examined 10 years' of antidepressant and hypnotic prescribing records contained in the DIN-LINK Database, which contains prescription records for more
The sedative hypnotics can be helpful to patients but also quite damaging.
(8) Melatonin and valerian are "natural" hypnotics that are available without a prescription, (9) but their safety and efficacy are not regulated by the FDA.
At the baseline interview in 1985, 166 (weighted prevalence = 15%) respondents reported the use of prescription hypnotics. Four-year outcomes (1985 -89) among the 166 hypnotic users are shown in Table 5.
While the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and/or sleep disorders in people with T2DM is high (20%) [13, 14], we expect equally frequent prescription of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics. One study from Finland reported that antidepressant use among men and women who develop T2DM was 2 times higher than the use in nondiabetic individuals [15].