Hypnotic state


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hyp·no·sis

(hip-nō'sis),
An artificially induced trancelike state, resembling somnambulism, in which the subject is highly susceptible to suggestion, oblivious to all else, and responds readily to the commands of the hypnotist; its scientific validity has been accepted and rejected through several cycles during the past 2 centuries. See: mesmerism.
[G. hypnos, sleep, + -osis, condition]

Hypnotic state

A state of heightened awareness that can be used to modulate the perception of pain.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General
References in periodicals archive ?
The process begins with what is called induction--that is, being brought into a hypnotic state.
Hypnotic state has the following characteristics (19):
Even with voluntary participation, not everyone can be led into a hypnotic state.
Once this phase of the treatment has been completed, the client is brought out of the hypnotic state, and after brief client feedback, the consultation is completed.
At this stage the susceptible viewer doesn't mind what is being watched and is lulled into an almost hypnotic state.
They were then brought out of the hypnotic state and asked to respond to a set of yes-or-no questions about the movie.
Out of the hypnotic state, they answered yes-or-no questions about the movie while their brains were scanned.
But when hypnosis is used as an adjunct to treat a specific problem, the operator usually guides the person in the hypnotic state in a formal, structured manner.
But can't help wondering if she is still in some hypnotic state.
An Eqyptian-Canadian, Maryem Tollar sings in both English and Arabic, often employing a syncopated cadence that invites a warm, hypnotic state in the listener.
In the PG-rated shows, volunteers will be brought onstage and induced into a hypnotic state, then perform as famous singers, dancers, comedians and sports personalities.