hypnotic

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Related to Hypnotic drugs: Sedative drugs

hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

/hyp·not·ic/ (hip-not´ik)
1. inducing sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

[hipnot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypnos, sleep
one of a class of drugs often used as sedatives. See also hypnagogue.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

1. pertaining to or inducing hypnosis or sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although consistent in identifying elderly people as the group most likely to report disturbed sleep and hypnotic drug use [9], these have provided few insights into the incidence of, or outcomes associated with, insomnia in later life.
Developing earlier cross-sectional work [12,13], these analyses specifically address (i) outcomes among prevalent cases of insomnia, (ii) the incidence of insomnia, (iii) outcomes among incident cases of insomnia and (iv) temporal trends in hypnotic drug use among elderly patients.
27] Alcohol use was not a confounding variable: the rate of reported alcohol use was equal for both current users and nonusers of sedative hypnotic drugs.
Based on the large database studies, the association between hip fracture and the use of long-acting benzodiazepines, as compared with that of the shorter-acting benzodiazepines and sedative hypnotic drugs, is statistically significant but weak in magnitude (risk estimate, 1.
The findings, which support those of numerous prior studies that also suggested a link between hypnotics and increased mortality and between hypnotics and cancer, are important given that hypnotic drugs are among the most widely used treatments in medicine; an estimated 6%-10% of adults in the United States used hypnotics in 2010, the investigators reported.
Perhaps the most striking finding was that an increased hazard for death was present even in the lowest tertile of hypnotic use, such that hypnotic drugs were associated with a 3.
31) The presence of enhanced receptor actions of modern hypnotic drugs is sometimes arguable.
A program of gradual weaning was chosen as the comparator arm because it's the standard therapy available today to patients who present to their physicians asking for help in getting off hypnotic drugs.
This additional selection criterion was applied to increase the likelihood that possible observed differences in objective sleep/wake measures between groups could be attributed to differences in living conditions rather than to such mediating factors as hypnotic drug usage.
The FDA is particularly concerned with a bar graph in the materials that compares Rozerem with 18 hypnotic drugs on "likelihood of abuse" and "toxicity" scores, with Rozerem scoring zero.
At his house in Sale, Cheshire, he fed the aspiring models a diet of hypnotic drugs, pretending they were slimming tablets and vitamin pills, before raping them.
Rozerem does not produce the CNS sedation, memory impairment, or imbalance that are side effects of the other hypnotic drugs approved for insomnia, a particular advantage in elderly patients; said Gary Richardson, M.