hypnotic

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Related to Hypnotic drugs: Sedative drugs

hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although consistent in identifying elderly people as the group most likely to report disturbed sleep and hypnotic drug use [9], these have provided few insights into the incidence of, or outcomes associated with, insomnia in later life.
Developing earlier cross-sectional work [12,13], these analyses specifically address (i) outcomes among prevalent cases of insomnia, (ii) the incidence of insomnia, (iii) outcomes among incident cases of insomnia and (iv) temporal trends in hypnotic drug use among elderly patients.
In contrast to shorter-acting benzodiazepines and other sedative hypnotic drugs, such as chloral hydrate and hydroxyzine, long-acting benzodiazepines were associated with an increased risk of hip fracture.
In addition, the use of hypnotic drugs was associated with an increased incidence of cancer among those receiving higher quantities.
(31) The presence of enhanced receptor actions of modern hypnotic drugs is sometimes arguable.
Regular use of prescribed non-sedative hypnotic drugs differed significantly between groups and increased along the sequence IL, SH and NH.
Allgulander C: Dependence on sedative and hypnotic drugs: A comparative clinical and social study.
The FDA is particularly concerned with a bar graph in the materials that compares Rozerem with 18 hypnotic drugs on "likelihood of abuse" and "toxicity" scores, with Rozerem scoring zero.
At his house in Sale, in the city, he fed the aspiring models a diet of hypnotic drugs, pretending they were slimming tablets and vitamin pills, before raping them.
The research is the first to show that eight of the most commonly used hypnotic drugs were associated with increased hazards of mortality and cancer, including the popularly prescribed medications zolpidem (known by the brand name Ambien) and temazepam (also known as Restoril), Dr.
Rozerem does not produce the CNS sedation, memory impairment, or imbalance that are side effects of the other hypnotic drugs approved for insomnia, a particular advantage in elderly patients; said Gary Richardson, M.D., senior research scientist at the Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit.
Rozerem does not produce the CNS sedation, memory impairment, or imbalance that are side effects of the other hypnotic drugs approved for insomnia, a particular advantage in elderly patients, said Gary Richardson, M.D., senior research scientist at the Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit.