hyperthermophile

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hyperthermophile

(hī′pər-thûr′mə-fīl′)
n.
Any of various organisms, such as certain bacteria and archaea, requiring temperatures of 80°C (176°F) or higher to thrive.

hy′per·ther′mo·phil′ic (-fĭl′ĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
The class II XIs consists of approximately 440 amino acids and varies more in their sources containing enzymes from mesophiles thermophiles and hyperthermophiles. However the amino acids involved in substrate and metal binding as well as catalysis are completely conserved in both classes (Bhosale et al.
But, hyperthermophiles had colonised all of the Haughton Crater - over 12 miles across and at least 200 metres below the Earth's surface, indicating that they would have been able to live deep underground in the darkness known as the 'deep biosphere'.
These hardy organisms are known as hyperthermophiles because of their extraordinary heat tolerance.
Since many archaea are also hyperthermophiles and may be the most ancient life-forms on the planet, the investigators speculate that the archaea gave genes to A.
About 60 new species of hyperthermophiles have been discovered since these types of communities were first encountered in the late 1970s in a tectonically active area north of the Galapagos Islands.
Little is known about the effects of heavy metals on hyperthermophiles, specifically hyperthermophilic Archaea.
Heat-loving microbes called hyperthermophiles grow in the walls of undersea vents.
DNA stability at temperatures typical for hyperthermophiles. Nucl.
The microbes that Stetter discovered, subsequently termed hyperthermophiles (or just thermophiles), were found in areas where mixing of the superheated water with the surrounding seawater produced temperatures close to 100 [degrees] C.
Some scientists liken these creatures, called hyperthermophiles, to the earliest forms of life on Earth.
Nowadays the enzymes from hyperthermophiles are widely used in industries (Sabir et al., 2017) and especially are replacing the use of other amylolytic enzymes in starch industry.
Birkeland, "Comparison of isocitrate dehydrogenase from three hyperthermophiles reveals differences in thermostability, cofactor specificity, oligomeric state, and phylogenetic affiliation," Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.