hyperthermophile


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Related to hyperthermophile: Mesophile, psychrophile

hyperthermophile

(hī′pər-thûr′mə-fīl′)
n.
Any of various organisms, such as certain bacteria and archaea, requiring temperatures of 80°C (176°F) or higher to thrive.

hy′per·ther′mo·phil′ic (-fĭl′ĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nowadays the enzymes from hyperthermophiles are widely used in industries (Sabir et al., 2017) and especially are replacing the use of other amylolytic enzymes in starch industry.
CCA-adding enzymes and poly(A) polymerases are all members of the same nucleotidyltransferase superfamily: characterization of the CCA-adding enzyme from the archaeal hyperthermophile Sulfolobus shibatae.
Ladenstein, "Isocitrate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix: X-ray structure analysis of a ternary enzyme-substrate complex and thermal stability," Journal of Molecular Biology, vol.
APUs enzymes discovered from hyperthermophiles are replacing the use of other amylolytic enzymes in starch industry.
Adams, "Whole-genome DNA microarray analysis of a hyperthermophile and an archaeon: Pyrococcus furiosus grown on carbohydrates or peptides," Journal of Bacteriology, vol.
Most of the microbes are thermopiles or hyperthermophiles and capable of withstanding and growing at a very high temperature.
Among their topics are the diversity of thermophilic microorganisms and their roles in the carbon cycle, lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction by the extremely thermophilic genus Caldicellulosiruptor, alcohol dehydrogenases and their physiological functions in hyperthermophiles, DNA replication in thermophilic microorganisms, the metabolic engineering of thermophiles for biofuel production, and thermophilic viruses and their association with thermophiles.
Use of Fe(III) as an Electron Acceptor to Recover Previously Uncultured Hyperthermophiles: Isolation and Characterization of Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen.
This enzyme is present in psychrophiles [4, 7], mesophiles [8], thermophiles [9, 10], and hyperthermophiles [11, 12].
Atomi, "Recent progress towards the application of hyperthermophiles and their enzymes," Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, vol.
The sulfide-rich water jets create chimneylike structures around each superheated plume, supporting a rich ecosystem of hyperthermophiles (the environment can be about 230 degrees Fahrenheit) that survive on chemosynthesis (converting sulfides into energy).