hypermobility


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hypermobility: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Double jointed

hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-mō-bil'i-tē),
Increased range of movement of joints, and joint laxity, occurring normally in children and adolescents or as a result of disease, for example, Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

hypermobility

/hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty/ (-mo-bil´ĭ-te) greater than normal range of motion in a joint.hypermo´bile

hypermobility

[-mōbil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hyper, L, mobilis, movable
an abnormally wide range of movement of the joints. The condition is seen in children and may be associated with Marfan's syndrome.

hypermobility

Instability Orthopedics Any motion occurring in a joint in response to the reactive force of gravity at a time when that joint should be stable under such a load; hypermobility is often misused to describe extra movement as seen in a contortionist.

Hypermobility

Unusual flexibility of the joints, allowing them to be bent or moved beyond their normal range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive movement at a joint, which potentially leads to instability. This is as a result of changes to connective tissue, particularly collagen, which results in laxity of the supporting structures such as ligaments and tendons. There is a spectrum from the more serious, often genetic, conditions to the more common, which cause fewer problems but nevertheless increase the risk of injury. Hypermobility is assessed by the Beighton Score, which measures the degree of abnormal movement at the lower back, knees, elbows and hands. The higher the score (maximum 9), the more hypermobile an individual is. See also flexibility.

hypermobility,

n condition in which ligaments are loose; a click may be heard when the joint moves through a reasonable range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive mobility, as of a joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Beighton-Horan joint mobility index (BHJMI) was used to determine the severity of hypermobility.
7) In addition, hypermobility is associated with increased time off from dancing due to injury.
Also, our study revealed a significant clinical application of the association between JHM and GERD that ignited a considerable scientific interest which may help us in follow-up and management of other visceral disorders of hypermobility syndrome.
The researchers call for more discussion on the adverse effects of hypermobility, to realistically reflect the negative impact of frequent and long-haul travel.
15) who studied the correlation between hip internal rotation range of motion and lumbar hypermobility associated with low back pain.
Objective: To determine whether joint hypermobility is associated with pelvic organ prolapse.
Adolescents with hypermobility in their joints--or "double jointedness"--are almost twice as likely as their counterparts are to develop musculoskeletal pain in their shoulders, knees, ankles, and feet as they enter adulthood, according to a case-control study.
The family have been pushing to get specialist treatment at the Hypermobility Unit at St John's and St Elizabeth's.
The couple then face an agonising wait to see whether their unborn child will be affected by Izzy's genetic disorder - Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III, hypermobility.
DENVER - The common denominator between joint hypermobility and panic disorder might lie in the significantly enlarged amygdalae shown to be present in individuals with lax joints in a recent study.