hypermagnesemia

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hypermagnesemia

 [hi″per-mag″nĕ-se´me-ah]
an abnormally high magnesium content of the blood plasma. See table of Electrolyte Imbalances at electrolyte.

hy·per·mag·ne·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-mag'nĕ-sē'mē-ă),
An abnormally large concentration of magnesium in the blood serum.

hypermagnesemia

Magnesium intoxication A state characterized by ↑ serum magnesium, which is associated with ESRD, eclampsia therapy with magnesium sulfate, adrenocortical insufficiency–Addision's disease, uncontrolled DM, leukemia, hypothyroidism, magnesium-based antacid and laxative therapies Clinical Lethargy, shallow respiration, ↓ BP, ↓ tendon reflexes, ↓ neuromuscular transmission, ↓ CNS; symptoms correspond to magnesium serum levels: nausea occurs at 2-2.5 mmol/L–4-5 mEq/L → sedation, ↓ tendon reflexes, muscle weakness; at 2.5-5 mmol/L–5-10 mEq/L, hypotension, bradycardia, and systemic vasodilatation; arreflexia, coma, respiratory paralysis appear above these levels. See Magnesium.

hy·per·mag·ne·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-mag'nĕ-sē'mē-ă)
Excessive magnesium in blood; may be a result of chronic renal insufficiency, overuse of magnesium-containing laxatives or antacids, or severe dehydration. Signs include weakness, paralysis, drowsiness, confusion, bradycardia, hypotension, nausea, and vomiting.
Synonym(s): hypermagnesaemia.

Hypermagnesemia

An abnormally high concentration of magnesium in the blood.
Mentioned in: Magnesium Imbalance

hy·per·mag·ne·se·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-mag'nĕ-sē'mē-ă)
Excessive magnesium in blood; may be a result of chronic renal insufficiency, overuse of magnesium-containing laxatives or antacids, or severe dehydration. Signs include weakness, paralysis, drowsiness, confusion, bradycardia, hypotension, nausea, and vomiting.
Synonym(s): hypermagnesaemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypermagnesaemia (> 2.4) patients were not taken into study, as the prevalence was not significant.
Hypermagnesaemia is found less commonly than hypomagnesaemia.
Against this diagnosis, our patient presented with marked hyperphosphataemia (4.95mmol/L) and hypermagnesaemia (1.25mmol/L) which is inconsistent with the electrolyte derangement that are the hallmarks of refeeding syndrome [12,13].
[9-19] Some studies have found an increased mortality associated with admission hypomagnesaemia, [11, 12, 17] admission hypermagnesaemia, [11, 13, 17] the development of hypomagnesmia, [18] and the development of hypermagnesaemia;[6] while others have found no correlation at all.
A [chi square] test was performed, but in order to avoid too-small groups (n < 5), all patients who had developed both hypo- and hypermagnesaemia were grouped together with the patients who had only developed hypomagnesaemia.
Factors known to increase renal excretion include hypermagnesaemia, acute volume expansion, hyperaldosteronism, hypercalcaemia, ketoacidosis and diuretics.1 Kidneys are the primary route of elimination which averages 6-12 meq/day.
On the other hand some other studies have shown no such benefits and some have even demonstrated hypermagnesaemia in patients with wheat pill poisoning.16,18,19 So, there is conflicting data in literature on the role of magnesium sulphate in the treatment of acute aluminum phosphide poisoning.
Hypermagnesaemia is uncommon unless iatrogenic but can be associated with delays in AV and intraventricular conduction.
Serum magnesium less than 1.7 was considered to be hypomagnesaemia and more than 2.4 was considered to be hypermagnesaemia.
Hypermagnesaemia is commonly believed to have clinical importance only in the presence of renal dysfunction (1).
Hirschfelder and Haury (1934), Martin et al (1952) found (1) hypomagnesaemia while Pradhan el al (1964)(2) and numerous others workers found definite hypermagnesaemia in chronic renal disease.
Here hypermagnesaemia in severe preeclampsia is noted which contradicts the present study.