hypermobility

(redirected from Hyperlaxity)
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hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-mō-bil'i-tē),
Increased range of movement of joints, and joint laxity, occurring normally in children and adolescents or as a result of disease, for example, Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

hypermobility

/hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty/ (-mo-bil´ĭ-te) greater than normal range of motion in a joint.hypermo´bile

hypermobility

[-mōbil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hyper, L, mobilis, movable
an abnormally wide range of movement of the joints. The condition is seen in children and may be associated with Marfan's syndrome.

hypermobility

Instability Orthopedics Any motion occurring in a joint in response to the reactive force of gravity at a time when that joint should be stable under such a load; hypermobility is often misused to describe extra movement as seen in a contortionist.

Hypermobility

Unusual flexibility of the joints, allowing them to be bent or moved beyond their normal range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive movement at a joint, which potentially leads to instability. This is as a result of changes to connective tissue, particularly collagen, which results in laxity of the supporting structures such as ligaments and tendons. There is a spectrum from the more serious, often genetic, conditions to the more common, which cause fewer problems but nevertheless increase the risk of injury. Hypermobility is assessed by the Beighton Score, which measures the degree of abnormal movement at the lower back, knees, elbows and hands. The higher the score (maximum 9), the more hypermobile an individual is. See also flexibility.

hypermobility,

n condition in which ligaments are loose; a click may be heard when the joint moves through a reasonable range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive mobility, as of a joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Classification of Recurrent Instability Dislocation Subluxation Apprehension Chronic pain Table 2 Risk Factors for Recurrent Instability Patient-related Young age Male gender Contact/Collision sports Surgeon-related Misdiagnosis (posterior instability/MDI/IGHL) Technical factors Failure to address pathology Non-anatomic labral repair < 3 anchors used incorrect drill hole placement inadequate restoration of glenoid concavity Pathology-related Glenoid bone loss > 25% Stretched IGHL Anterior hyperlaxity Large Hill-Sachs Concominant pathology (SLAP tears, rotator cuff tears, HAGL lesions, etc.
The majority of patients, however, do not have a named disorder but are born with the hyperlaxity.
9), external rotation of more than 90 [degrees] and a shift test of 3+ or more which suggests hyperlaxity.
There is no literature on hyperlaxity and accessory nerve palsy that was observed in our patient.
The authors suggest that this device may be beneficial in those patients with hyperlaxity acquired as a result of poor neuromuscular control.
A thorough ligamentous examination should be performed to rule out other causes of instability, such as generalized hyperlaxity from connective tissue disorders.
The etiology is often pre-existing hyperlaxity combined with overuse.
After careful examination of the uninvolved and injured knees, other joints should be examined for hyperlaxity.
Repetitive microtrauma to the anterior static stabilizers of the shoulder can result in ligamentous stretching and hyperlaxity, leading to anterior translation of the humeral head on the glenoid.