hypermobility

(redirected from Hyperlaxity)
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hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-mō-bil'i-tē),
Increased range of movement of joints, and joint laxity, occurring normally in children and adolescents or as a result of disease, for example, Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

hypermobility

/hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty/ (-mo-bil´ĭ-te) greater than normal range of motion in a joint.hypermo´bile

hypermobility

[-mōbil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hyper, L, mobilis, movable
an abnormally wide range of movement of the joints. The condition is seen in children and may be associated with Marfan's syndrome.

hypermobility

Instability Orthopedics Any motion occurring in a joint in response to the reactive force of gravity at a time when that joint should be stable under such a load; hypermobility is often misused to describe extra movement as seen in a contortionist.

Hypermobility

Unusual flexibility of the joints, allowing them to be bent or moved beyond their normal range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive movement at a joint, which potentially leads to instability. This is as a result of changes to connective tissue, particularly collagen, which results in laxity of the supporting structures such as ligaments and tendons. There is a spectrum from the more serious, often genetic, conditions to the more common, which cause fewer problems but nevertheless increase the risk of injury. Hypermobility is assessed by the Beighton Score, which measures the degree of abnormal movement at the lower back, knees, elbows and hands. The higher the score (maximum 9), the more hypermobile an individual is. See also flexibility.

hypermobility,

n condition in which ligaments are loose; a click may be heard when the joint moves through a reasonable range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive mobility, as of a joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study described and mapped the new form of CMD with joint hyperlaxity distinct from COL6-related dystrophies.
Table 1 Classification of Recurrent Instability Dislocation Subluxation Apprehension Chronic pain Table 2 Risk Factors for Recurrent Instability Patient-related Young age Male gender Contact/Collision sports Surgeon-related Misdiagnosis (posterior instability/MDI/IGHL) Technical factors Failure to address pathology Non-anatomic labral repair < 3 anchors used incorrect drill hole placement inadequate restoration of glenoid concavity Pathology-related Glenoid bone loss > 25% Stretched IGHL Anterior hyperlaxity Large Hill-Sachs Concominant pathology (SLAP tears, rotator cuff tears, HAGL lesions, etc.
Addi- tionally some disorders of collagen metabolism such as ligamentous hyperlaxity and Ehler-Danlos syndrome might be related.
Joint hyperlaxity, arachnodactyly, pecus excavatum or carinatum, scoliosis and contractures of the feet (talipes equinovarus) are seen in LDS patients, and are also common in Marfan syndrome.
Patients with hyperlaxity may also experience pain without instability and this may be due to impingement.
This study failed to show that body type, hyperlaxity, family history, degree of trauma, time missed from work, and duration of use of sling influenced the rate of recurrence.
In physiologic genu varum there is a gentle curve involving both the thigh and the leg with more pronounced bowing in the lower third of the femur and at the juncture of the middle and upper thirds of the tibia [17]; whereas in ligamentus hyperlaxity it is at the knee joint.
Possible explanations for the difference in the incidence at birth and prevalence at later part of life is that a) at birth fat is present in the sole which get absorbed by three years of age and b) the hyperlaxity of ligaments gets corrected by the age of six (10-12).
It is very important on your physical exam to try to distinguish between hypotonia and isolated joint hyperlaxity," Dr.
While various degrees of hyperlaxity, muscular tightness, weakness, asymmetry of strength or flexibility, poor endurance, and abnormal foot configuration may predispose an athlete to increased risk of injury during sports competition, studies have failed to demonstrate conclusively that injuries are prevented by interventions aimed at correcting such abnormalities.
0 months), and presented with neonatal hypotonia, delayed motor milestones, distal hyperlaxity, and proximal muscle weakness for a median duration of 5.
The commonly recognized causes of posterior hip instability include hyperlaxity, acetabular or femoral retroversion, bony or ligamentous lesions of the acetabulum, or following trauma or arthroplasty.