cytokine storm

(redirected from Hypercytokinemia)
A potentially fatal hyperrelease of inflammatory mediators in response to stimulation of T cells and macrophages by pathogens and immune insults
Triggers Graft versus host disease, adult respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, avian influenza, and systemic inflammatory response syndrome

cytokine storm

The massive release of interleukins, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and other circulating mediators of inflammation during critical illness. These agents may trigger bleeding, clotting, internal organ injury, or shock.
See also: storm
References in periodicals archive ?
HLH is a rare, potentially fatal disorder characterized by abnormal macrophages proliferation and hypercytokinemia.
Sleep apnea and daytime sleepiness and fatigue: relation to visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and hypercytokinemia.
Fatal outcome of human influenza A (H5N1) is associated with high viral load and hypercytokinemia.
Vgontzas AN, Papanicolaou DA, Bixler EO, Hopper K, Lotsikas A, Lin HM, Kales A, Chorousos GP Sleep apnea and daytime sleepiness and fatigue: relation to visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and hypercytokinemia.
DISCUSSION: HLH is a rare, life threatening hyperinflammatory syndrome, caused by severe hypercytokinemia due to a highly stimulated but ineffective immune process.
Epithelial dysfunction in influenza may be influenced by hypercytokinemia and epithelial cell apoptosis.
In addition to hypercytokinemia, HLH is associated with low or absent natural killer (NK)-cell and cytotoxic T cell activity7.
recently considered the role of hypercytokinemia in the pathogenesis and as mentioned above, Okumura et al.
Article reviewed: Sleep apnea and daytime sleepiness and fatigue: Related to visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and hypercytokinemia.
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is related to uncontrolled activation of T-lymphocytes and monocytes that leads to hypercytokinemia with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-[alpha]), interferon gamma (INF-[gamma]), interleukin (IL) -6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-18.
The scientists' research paper titled, "Th1 and Th17 hypercytokinemia as early host response signature in severe pandemic influenza" has appeared in the December issue of the Journal of Critical Care.