cytokine storm

(redirected from Hypercytokinemia)
A potentially fatal hyperrelease of inflammatory mediators in response to stimulation of T cells and macrophages by pathogens and immune insults
Triggers Graft versus host disease, adult respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, avian influenza, and systemic inflammatory response syndrome

cytokine storm

The massive release of interleukins, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and other circulating mediators of inflammation during critical illness. These agents may trigger bleeding, clotting, internal organ injury, or shock.
See also: storm
References in periodicals archive ?
Vgontzas AN, Papanicolaou DA, Bixler EO, Hopper K, Lotsikas A, Lin HM, Kales A, Chorousos GP Sleep apnea and daytime sleepiness and fatigue: relation to visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and hypercytokinemia.
Epithelial dysfunction in influenza may be influenced by hypercytokinemia and epithelial cell apoptosis.
Fatal outcome of human influenza A (H5N1) is associated with high viral load and hypercytokinemia.
Article reviewed: Sleep apnea and daytime sleepiness and fatigue: Related to visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and hypercytokinemia.
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is related to uncontrolled activation of T-lymphocytes and monocytes that leads to hypercytokinemia with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-[alpha]), interferon gamma (INF-[gamma]), interleukin (IL) -6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-18.
The scientists' research paper titled, "Th1 and Th17 hypercytokinemia as early host response signature in severe pandemic influenza" has appeared in the December issue of the Journal of Critical Care.
Sleep Apnea and daytime sleepiness and fatigue; relation to visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and hypercytokinemia.
de Jong MD, Simmons CP, Thanh TT, Hien VM, Smith GJ, Chau TN, Hoang DM, Chau NV, Khanh TH, Dong VC, Dui PT, Cam BV, Ha do Q, Guan Y, Peiris JS, Chinh NT, Hien TT, Farrar J, Fatal outcome of human influenza A (H5N1) is associated with high viral load and hypercytokinemia, Nat.
1-3) Hypercytokinemia leads to fever and multiorgan dysfunction including pancytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), diffuse alveolar damage, hepatosplenomegaly, elevation of serum ferritin, triglycerides and liver enzymes and neurologic disorders.
The ability of H5N1 virus to proliferate in blood represents a causative effect for triggering hypercytokinemia (cytokine storm), a direct parallel to the Spanish Flu of 1918, which reportedly killed up to 40 million people within 20 months.
Although the mechanism of hemophagocytosis induction in cases of brucellosis is not well understood, immune system derangement, with defective T-cell functioning, T-cell and monocyte hyperactivation, hypercytokinemia, and selective deficiency in cellular cytotoxicity has been reported.