hyperchloremia

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hyperchloremia

 [hi″per-klo-re´me-ah]
excess of chlorides in the blood; this occurs as a result of fluid deficit for which the kidney seeks to compensate by reabsorbing large amounts of water and the chloride dissolved in it. The signs and symptoms of hyperchloremia are the same as those of acidosis. adj., adj hyperchlore´mic.

hy·per·chlor·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-klōr-ē'mē-ă),
An abnormally large amount of chloride ions in the circulating blood.
Synonym(s): chloremia (2)

hyperchloremia

/hy·per·chlor·emia/ (-klor-e´me-ah) an excess of chlorides in the blood.hyperchlore´mic

hyperchloremia

(hī′pər-klôr-ē′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormally large amount of chloride ions in the blood.

hyperchloremia

[-klôrē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + chloros, green, haima, blood
an excessive level of chloride in the blood that results in acidosis. Also spelled hyperchloraemia.

hy·per·chlor·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-klōr-ē'mē-ă)
An abnormally large concentration of chloride ions in the circulating blood.
Synonym(s): hyperchloraemia.

hyperchloremia,

n disproportionate levels of chloride in the blood. Causes acidosis.

hy·per·chlor·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-klōr-ē'mē-ă)
Abnormally large amount of chloride ions in the circulating blood.
Synonym(s): hyperchloraemia.

hyperchloremia

excess of chlorides in the blood; occurs as a result of fluid deficit for which the kidney attempts to compensate by reabsorbing large amounts of water and the chloride dissolved in it. The clinical signs of hyperchloremia are those of acidosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyperchloraemia is a common consequence of kidney injury, and although previously thought innocuous has a detrimental effect on outcome when combined with another acidosis.
Several individual electrolyte concentrations also differed between groups at T2 and T3, most notably the appearance of hyperchloraemia in the bicarbonate-balanced group at both time points.
Experimental hyperchloraemia reduces renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (18) and causes inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activation, acute lung injury and intestinal dysfunction (19-21).
This was either because the patients were critically ill with multiple potential causes of metabolic acidosis, or because the laboratory parameters presented could neither conclusively establish an elevated serum lactate concentration, nor exclude hyperchloraemia as a cause of acidosis.