hypercapnia

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hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă),
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia

/hy·per·cap·nia/ (-kap´ne-ah) excessive carbon dioxide in the blood.hypercap´nic

hypercapnia

(hī′pər-kăp′nē-ə)
n.
1. An abnormally high concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by acute respiratory failure from conditions such as asthma and obstructive pulmonary disease. It can lead to seizures and death if acute and untreated.
2. Carbon dioxide poisoning due to abnormally high concentrations of carbon dioxide in an organism's environment.

hypercapnia

[hī′pərkap′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + kapnos, vapor
greater than normal amounts of carbon dioxide in the blood. Also called hypercarbia.

hypercapnia

↑ CO2 in blood. See Permissive hypercapnia.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypercarbia.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia

A higher than normal level of carbon dioxide in the blood. This suggests that ventilation in the air sacs of the lungs (alveoli) is inadequate possibly because the sensitivity of the respiratory centre to raised CO2 levels has been affected. In health, hypercapnia always causes an increased rate and depth of breathing.

hypercapnia

The presence of a raised carbon dioxide content or tension in a milieu (e.g. blood, tears). Contact lens wear tends to give rise to this condition, especially lenses of low gas transmissibility. See acidosis.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

(hī'pĕr-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally increased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
[hyper- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypercapnia, hypercarbia

excess of carbon dioxide in the blood, indicated by an elevated Pco2 as determined by blood gas analysis, and resulting in respiratory acidosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arterial blood gases demonstrated severe hypoxemia in all patients and some with hypercapnea (12 of 30) (Sandoval et al.
When the airways become obstructed as a result of these disease processes, patients experience excess sputum production, difficulty breathing, coughing, hypoxemia, and hypercapnea.