Hymenolepsis nana

The only human tapeworm with no intermediate host
Epidemiology It is most common in warm, dry climates; infection is by direct transmission, often among families, and in institutions; the eggs hatch in stomach and small intestine, penetrate villi and metamorphose into cercocysts; recalcitrant infections are maintained by autoinfection
Treatment Praziquantel, niclosamide

Hymenolepsis nana

A dwarf tapeworm that commonly infests children living in poor conditions in tropical areas. Children are infected directly by ingesting the eggs and no intermediate host is involved. Heavy infestations can cause ENTERITIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
dispar, four had Ascaris lumbricoides, three had Ancylostoma duodenale and two had Hymenolepsis nana.
8 percent) and the most common helminth was Hymenolepsis nana (5.