hydroxide

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hydroxide

 [hi-drok´sīd]
the OH anion or a compound containing the OH ion.

hy·drox·ide

(hī-drok'sīd),
1. A compound containing a potentially ionizable hydroxyl group; particularly a compound that liberates OH- upon dissolving in water.
2. The hydroxide anion, OH-.

hydroxide

/hy·drox·ide/ (hi-drok´sīd) any compound containing a hydroxyl group.

hydroxide (OH-)

[hīdrok′sīd]
an ion.

hy·drox·ide

(hī-drok'sīd)
A compound containing a potentially ionizable hydroxyl group; particularly a compound that liberates OH- on dissolving in water.

hy·drox·ide

(hī-drok'sīd)
A compound containing a potentially ionizable hydroxyl group.

hydroxide (hīdrok´sīd´),

n an ionic compound that contains the OH2 ion, usually consisting of metals or the metal equivalent of the ammonium cation (NH42) that inactivates an acid.

hydroxide

the OH anion or a compound containing the OH ion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team, which includes chemistry professor Stephen Hanessian, initially examined the possibility of simply removing a hydroxyl group from neomycin to limit the effectiveness of the aminoglycoside-inactivating enzyme.
Large differences in Arrhenius parameters allowed experimental data to be used to identify parameters specific to primary, secondary, and hindered secondary hydroxyl groups.
The table shows that lignin structure is changed after biomodification and amount of phenolic hydroxyl groups.
The polymerization process was found to be catalyzed by hydroxyl groups of amine propyltrihydroxylsilane.
The ethyl substitution on the free hydroxyl group of the aegeline had shown the most fat accumulation inhibition from A.
It's not 'liquid' water that was measured during these studies but hydroxyl groups distributed within the mineral grain.
Chitosan is of particular interest because the chemical structures of amine and hydroxyl groups act as chelating sites for the adsorption of metal ions, specifically heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions and drinking water.
The scientists think that the molecule's chemical limbs, called hydroxyl groups, help break apart the bonds between two hydrogen atoms so hydrogen can be stored in a liquid.
g] combined with the hydroxyl groups reacting with the melamine leads to significantly higher early and final hardness.
Introduction of hydroxyl groups at the position of double bonds of triglycerides opens the whole area of applications.
However, the surface of amorphous silica is rich in hydroxyl groups that make it hydrophilic.
Examples of specific topics include the concentration of hydroxyl groups on glass surfaces and their effect on the structure of silane deposits, characterization of silane pretreatment for organic coatings on copper, hydrothermal degradation of hydrophobic organosilane films determined by neutron reflectometry, water absorption and transport in bis-amino silane film, chromate-free silane-containing primer technology, zinc phosphate as an effective anticorrosion pigment in silane-based waterborn primers, application of nanosols to improve functional properties of p-aramide fabrics used for bullet-proof vests, and photocatalytic titania derived by sol-gel technique for textile application.