apolar

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Related to Hydrophobe: hydrophile

apolar

 [a-po´lar]
having neither poles nor processes; without polarity.

a·po·lar

(ā-pō'lăr),
1. Without poles; specifically denoting embryonic nerve cells (neuroblasts) that have not yet begun to sprout processes.
2. Synonym(s): hydrophobic (2)
References in periodicals archive ?
The sequence distribution of the hydrophobic monomers in the copolymers was controlled by varying the number of hydrophobes per micelles, [N.sub.H], and it was assumed that the hydrophobe content corresponds to the initial feed composition.
The concentration of AT hydrophobes in a coating is low and would not promote a significant viscosity increase without interactions with other components in the coating.
With the [C.sub.18][H.sub.37](EO)[.sub.100] large hydrophobe, an additional viscosity synergy is possible, as observed with larger hydrophobic HEUR thickeners.
(3-5) HASE thickeners are based on a polyelectrolyte backbone, usually methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethylacrylate (EA) copolymer, with pendant hydrophobes (i.e., hydrophobes that are attached to the backbone with polyethylene oxide chains).
(14) The reciprocal of [tau] can then be approximated by the hydrophobe dissociation rate, [[beta].sub.0], characterized by a bonding potential, [E.sub.m],
Charola, Hydrophobe III, University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany, 2001.
The hydrophobe content was limited to 1 mol% and the incorporation level, determined by [sup.1]H-NMR spectroscopy, was close to the alimentation monomer feed.
Yarus, "An RNA Pocket for anAliphatic Hydrophobe," Nature Structural Biology 1 (1994): 287-92; I.
The very fact they got me through the basic scuba-diving certificate is something of an achievement for such a hydrophobe.
The alkyl functionality also acts as a hydrophobe to reduce water absorption.
The reactions were maintained at their respective temperatures until the hydrophobe solids reached approximately 23 percent, which corresponded to a water tolerance (WT) of approximately 200 percent.
In "Ithaca," Stephen declines Bloom's invitation to wash his hands, insisting he is a "hydrophobe" (17.237), and the overly meticulous voice of the "Ithaca" narrator echoes Stephen's distaste for water, declaring an "incompatibility of aquacity with the erratic originality of genius" (17.247).