hydrolysis

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Related to Hydrolization: hydrolysis

hydrolysis

 [hi-drol´ĭsis] (pl. hydrol´yses)
the cleavage of a compound by the addition of water, the hydroxyl group being incorporated in one fragment and the hydrogen atom in the other. adj., adj hydrolyt´ic.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis),
A chemical process whereby a compound is cleaved into two or more simpler compounds with the uptake of the H and OH parts of a water molecule on either side of the chemical bond cleaved; hydrolysis is effected by the action of acids, alkalies, or enzymes. Compare: hydration.
Synonym(s): hydrolytic cleavage
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

hydrolysis

/hy·drol·y·sis/ (hi-drol´ĭ-sis) pl. hydrol´yses   the cleavage of a compound by the addition of water, the hydroxyl group being incorporated in one fragment and the hydrogen atom in the other.hydrolyt´ic

hydrolysis

[hīdrol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, hydor + lysis, loosening
the chemical alteration or decomposition of a compound with water.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis)
A chemical process whereby a compound is cleaved into two or more simpler compounds with the uptake of the H and OH parts of a water molecule on either side of the chemical bond cleaved; hydrolysis is effected by the action of acids, alkalies, or enzymes.
Compare: hydration
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

hydrolysis

Splitting of a compound into two parts by the addition of water (H2O), the hydrogen atom (H) joining to one part and the hydroxyl group (OH) joining to the other. Hydrolysis is usually effected by a hydrolytic ENZYME.

hydrolysis

a chemical reaction in which large molecules are broken down by the addition of water. For example, fat to fatty acids and glycerol, MALTOSE to glucose, DIPEPTIDE to two amino acids. The reactions are usually enzymically activated. Compare CONDENSATION REACTION.

hydrolysis

chemical cleavage of a compound (by acid, alkali or enzymic action) into simpler compounds

hydrolysis (hī·drˑ·l·sis),

n a chemical reaction in which a substance reacts with water.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis)
1. Process by which water slowly penetrates suture filaments and breaks down the suture's polymer chain; hydroxylation produces less tissue reaction.
2. Chemical process in which compound is cloven into two or more simpler compounds; effected by action of acids, alkalis, or enzymes.
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

hydrolysis (hīdrol´isis),

n 1. a reaction between the ions of salt and those of water to form an acid and a base, one or both of which is only slightly dissociated. A process whereby a large molecule is split by the addition of water. The end products divide the water, the hydroxyl group being attached to one and the hydrogen ion to the other.
n 2. the splitting of a compound into two parts with the addition of the elements of water.

hydrolysis

the cleavage of a compound by the addition of water, the hydroxyl group being incorporated in one fragment and the hydrogen atom in the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be seen from Table 1 that the crystallinity increases at higher weight fraction of the blend membranes, suggesting that the crystallization capacity of PFSA and PFCA is equivalent to their unblended state even after hydrolization.
After hydrolization, all membranes had sharply reduced peel strength due to the different swelling capacity of each individual layer during hydrolization.
Then the solution should be stirred for 12 h to complete hydrolization reaction until no phase separation occurred and the hydrolyzed silanes with--OH group could be dispersed through the aqueous solution.
On the other hand, hydrolization of adipose is done mainly by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) that has a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis and catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the breakdown of adipocyte triglyceride (Belfrage et al.
i] interferes severely with the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, down-regulates production of adenosine triphosphate, and even leads to mitochondrium disorganization, activating phospholipase and encouraging membrane phospholipid hydrolization.