hydrogel

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hydrogel

 [hi´dro-jel]
a gel that contains water.

hy·dro·gel

(hī'drō-jel),
A colloid in which the particles are in the external or dispersion phase and water in the internal or dispersed phase. Compare: hydrosol.

hydrogel

a gel in which water is the dispersion medium.

hydrogel

Wound care A polymer absorptive wound dressing. See Dressing.

hy·dro·gel

(hī'drō-jel)
A colloid in which the particles are in the external or dispersion phase and water in the internal or dispersed phase; used in sterile dressings and wound cane.

hydrogel

Type of plastic material which contains water, and is commonly used in the manufacture of soft contact lenses, e.g. HEMA.

hydrogel

a gel that contains water.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study PEGDMA based hydrogels with varying photoinitiator concentration were characterised using ATR-FTIR.
Hydrogels were washed with 1 mL PBS, incubated in 1 mL of PBS at 37[degrees]C in a humidor, and the supernatants were analyzed by an NDS 1000 spectrophotometer.
To engineer complex 3-D tissues, researchers at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston and the University of Sydney in Australia were able to combine a novel elastic hydrogel with microscale technologies to create an artificial cardiac tissue that mimics the mechanical and biological properties of the native heart.
Another experiment showed that the hydrogel could be successfully and stably synthesized within the channels of a microfluidic device.
Hence, the target of the current study was to exploit novel pH-sensitive collagen-based hydrogels for the effective ephedrine controlled release system.
Irradiation with UV not only enhanced overall L-DOPA release from the hydrogel, but also caused an extra 'explosive' release five hours after irradiation.
The next step would be to modify the hydrogel make it possible to inject it into damaged brain regions.
Vernerey envisions that the hydrogels could be stuffed with some kind of magnetic nanomaterial that will guide it where it needs to go.
The direct assembly of stimuli-responsive proteins into hydrogels opens enormous opportunities for material biology and medical treatment.
Given the toxicity of monomers, personal protective equipment and specific handling procedures were employed during the synthesis of materials and testing of "as prepared" hydrogels.
In fact, Burdick's gel is unique among hydrogels in providing mechanical support to stabilize the damaged area.