cortisol

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cortisol

 [kor´tĭ-sol]
a hormone from the adrenal cortex, the principal glucocorticoid; called also 17-hydroxycorticosterone and, pharmaceutically, hydrocortisone. A synthetic preparation is used for its antiinflammatory actions.

cor·ti·sol

(kōr'ti-sol),
The principal glucocorticoid produced by the zona fasciculata of the adrenal cortex. It promotes gluconeogenesis and lipolysis, suppresses protein synthesis, inhibits inflammatory and immune responses, and has mild mineralocorticoid (for example, hypernatremic, kaliureteric, antidiuretic) effects. Most plasma cortisol is bound to transcortin and albumin. Synthetic cortisol administered as a drug is usually known by the alternative name hydrocortisone.

cortisol

/cor·ti·sol/ (-sol) the major natural glucocorticoid elaborated by the adrenal cortex; it affects the metabolism of glucose, protein, and fats and has mineralocorticoid activity. See hydrocortisone for therapeutic uses.

cortisol

(kôr′tĭ-sôl′, -zôl′, -sōl′, -zōl′)
n.
A steroid hormone, C21H30O5, produced by the adrenal cortex, that regulates carbohydrate metabolism, maintains blood pressure, and is released in response to stress; hydrocortisone.

cortisol

[kôr′təsôl]
a steroid hormone produced naturally by the adrenal gland, identical to chemically synthesized hydrocortisone.
indications It is prescribed for adrenocortical insufficiency, topically for inflammation, and as an adjunct for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.
contraindications Fungal infections or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its systemic use. Viral or fungal infections of the skin, impaired circulation, or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its topical use.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse reactions to this drug are GI, endocrine, neurological, fluid, and electrolyte disturbances. Hypersensitivity reactions may result from topical administration.

cortisol

Hydrocortisone A major hormone produced by the adrenal cortex, which is the primary glucocorticoid secreted by the adrenal gland in response to ACTH stimulation or stress; cortisol has anti-inflammatory activity, and is involved in gluconeogenesis, glycogen storage in the liver, immune regulation, mediation of physiologic stress responses, Ca2+ absorption, secretion of gastric acid and pepsin, conversion of proteins to carbohydrates, and nutrient metabolism; it is secreted in a diurnal pattern–levels rise early morning, peak ± 8 am, and flatten in the evening, diurnal cycling is lost in Cushing syndrome; cortisol secretion is influenced by heat, cold, infection, trauma, excercise, obesity, intercurrent illness ↑ in Adrenal CA, Cushing's disease, ectopic ACTH, ectopic CRH, hyperthyroidism, depression, alcoholism, substance abuse, anorexia, heavy smoking, CA, ulcers, DM, chronic pain, strokes, CVA, Parkinson's disease, MS, psoriasis, acne, eczema, stress, aging, Alzheimer's disease, AIDS, space adaptation syndrome ↓ in Addison's disease, hypopituitarism, hypothyroidism. See Corticosteroid, Dexamethasone suppression test.

hy·dro·cor·ti·sone

(hī'drō-kōr'ti-sōn)
A steroid hormone secreted by the cortex of the suprarenal gland and the most potent of the naturally occurring glucocorticoids in humans.
Synonym(s): cortisol.

cortisol

A hormone produced by the adrenal cortex. Also called hydrocortisone.

cortisol

or

hydrocortisone

an adrenocortical steroid with effects similar to CORTISONE.

Cortisol

A hormone released by the cortex (outer portion) of the adrenal gland when a person is under stress. Cortisol levels are now considered a biological marker of suicide risk.

cortisol (kōrˑ·t·sōl),

n an adrenal hormone produced in response to stress.

cor·ti·sol

(kōr'ti-sol)
Principal glucocorticoid produced by the zona fasciculata of the cortex of the suprarenal gland; promotes gluconeogenesis and lipolysis and inhibits inflammatory and immune responses.

cortisol

a hormone from the adrenal cortex; the principal glucocorticoid. Called also 17-hydroxycorticosterone and, pharmaceutically, hydrocortisone. A synthetic preparation is used for its anti-inflammatory actions.

cortisol-binding globulin
much plasma cortisol is bound to a α-globulin—transcortin, some to albumin. Much is free and in the form of a glycuronide or sulfate.
cortisol:corticosterone ratio
the ratio between the two hormones is different between species and even between individual animals. There is also a circadian rhythm in the ratio which must therefore be interpreted with caution.
cortisol:creatinine (C/C) ratio
measured in the urine as a screening test for hyperadrenocorticism.
cortisol hemisuccinate
cortisol response test
see acth response test; dexamethasone suppression test.