plaster

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plaster

 [plas´ter]
1. a mixture of materials that hardens; used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. an adhesive substance spread on fabric or other suitable backing material, for application to the skin, often containing some medication, such as an analgesic or local vasodilator.
plaster of Paris calcium sulfate dihydrate, reduced to a fine powder; the addition of water produces a porous mass used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts, and in dentistry for making study models.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr),
1. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and that becomes adhesive at the temperature of the body; used to keep the edges of a wound in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, and, when medicated, to redden or blister the skin, as in mustard plaster, or to apply drugs to the surface to obtain their systemic effects.
2. In dentistry, colloquialism for plaster of Paris.
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

plaster

(plăs′tər)
n.
1. Plaster of Paris.
2. A pastelike mixture applied to a part of the body for healing or cosmetic purposes.
3. Chiefly British An adhesive bandage.
v. plas·tered, plas·tering, plas·ters
v.tr.
To apply a plaster to: plaster an aching muscle.
v.intr.
To apply plaster.

plas′ter·er n.
plas′ter·y adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr)
1. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and becomes adhesive at the temperature of the body; used to keep the edges of a wound in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, or to apply medicine topically for local or systemic effects.
2. dentistry A type of gypsum containing calcium sulfate hemihydrate and porous crystals that require more water during mixing than other such products; used in preparing study models (nonworking casts).
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr)
1. In dentistry, general term for calcined gypsum products used to fabricate dental casts and products used to attach casts to articulators. Principal constituent is calcium sulfate hemihydrate.
2. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and becomes adhesive at body temperature; used to keep wound edges in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, and, when medicated, to redden or blister skin, as in mustard plaster, or to apply drugs to the surface to obtain their systemic effects.
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrocal II oils are offered in a broad range of viscosities, from 36 SUS at 100 [degrees] F to 4,500 SUS at 100 [degrees] F.
Young, black and paraplegic - by contrast, Kley describes herself as ``an old Jewish woman from New York'' - her model sat for a number of Hydrocal portraits, which lately she's been decorating with bright pastels, giving him red lipstick and a fright wig.
Mastercraft had particularly strong interest in its contemporary and transitional glass lamps, large brushed steel lamps, hurricanes and ceramic lamps in decorative finishes that resemble similar hydrocal looks.
Here, too, is a reversal of Alterations, whose small Hydrocal figures were a good deal less individuated than the women Cutler painted.
The 100,000-square-foot complex houses woodworking, ceramic production, automated hydrocal production, and paint and custom- finishing facilities that expand its production capacity in the effort to reduce lead times.
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Indeed, her use of Hydrocal, a white gypsum cement, evidences an emphasis on making that displaces, or at least forestalls, incursions of exogenous meaning--or meaning apart from finding, manipulating, and making.
In the past five years, Emess shifted its product line from almost all domestic hydrocal and iron production to an assortment of imported brass, metal, glass and ceramic lamps, torchieres and desk lamps from the Far East.
The couch as artifact of the everyday is once again the theme in Couple, 2010, shown at Derek Eller; it sags deeply under the weight of a hulking Hydrocal plaster duo connected from the necks down, like Siamese twins.
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The foremost attraction were Hydrocal casts of the Carpenter Center mounted on wooden prostheses.
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