plaster

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plaster

 [plas´ter]
1. a mixture of materials that hardens; used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. an adhesive substance spread on fabric or other suitable backing material, for application to the skin, often containing some medication, such as an analgesic or local vasodilator.
plaster of Paris calcium sulfate dihydrate, reduced to a fine powder; the addition of water produces a porous mass used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts, and in dentistry for making study models.

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr),
1. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and that becomes adhesive at the temperature of the body; used to keep the edges of a wound in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, and, when medicated, to redden or blister the skin, as in mustard plaster, or to apply drugs to the surface to obtain their systemic effects.
2. In dentistry, colloquialism for plaster of Paris.
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]

plaster

/plas·ter/ (plas´ter)
1. a gypsum material that hardens when mixed with water, used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. a pastelike mixture that can be spread over the skin and that is adhesive at body temperature; varied uses include skin protectant and counterirritant.

plaster of Paris  calcined calcium sulfate; on addition of water it forms a porous mass that is used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts, and in dentistry for making study models.

plaster

(plăs′tər)
n.
1. Plaster of Paris.
2. A pastelike mixture applied to a part of the body for healing or cosmetic purposes.
3. Chiefly British An adhesive bandage.
v. plas·tered, plas·tering, plas·ters
v.tr.
To apply a plaster to: plaster an aching muscle.
v.intr.
To apply plaster.

plas′ter·er n.
plas′ter·y adj.

plaster

Etymology: Gk, emplastron
1 any composition of a liquid and a powder that hardens when it dries, used in shaping a cast to support a fractured bone as it heals, such as plaster of paris.
2 a home remedy consisting of a semisolid mixture applied to a part of the body as a counterirritant or for other therapeutic reasons, such as a mustard plaster.

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr)
1. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and becomes adhesive at the temperature of the body; used to keep the edges of a wound in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, or to apply medicine topically for local or systemic effects.
2. dentistry A type of gypsum containing calcium sulfate hemihydrate and porous crystals that require more water during mixing than other such products; used in preparing study models (nonworking casts).
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr)
1. In dentistry, general term for calcined gypsum products used to fabricate dental casts and products used to attach casts to articulators. Principal constituent is calcium sulfate hemihydrate.
2. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and becomes adhesive at body temperature; used to keep wound edges in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, and, when medicated, to redden or blister skin, as in mustard plaster, or to apply drugs to the surface to obtain their systemic effects.
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]

plaster

1. a mixture of materials that hardens; used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. an adhesive substance spread on fabric or other suitable backing material, for application to the skin, often containing some medication, such as an anodyne or rubefacient.

plaster cast
see cast (5).
plaster of Paris
calcium sulfate dihydrate, reduced to a fine powder; the addition of water produces a porous mass used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts.
plaster rolls
the dry material for constructing plaster casts is packaged as rolls of impregnated gauze which is thoroughly soaked in water before being applied by unrolling around the site of the fracture.
plaster shears
special shears to cut plaster of Paris casts. Designed to cut upwards away from the tissues to avoid injury. Called also plaster scissors, Esmarch plaster shears.
plaster spreader
a reverse pincer device with flat blades that are fitted down into a cut made in a plaster cast that is to be removed. Opening the handles forces the plaster apart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calsol naphthenic process oils are refined from a select blend of naphthenic crudes using the Hydrocal II process.
Weathered wood and rough stone intersect with smooth molded hydrocal (plasterlike) forms, canvas-covered painted structures, and girdings of metal.
Once the molds were carved out, hydrocal was used to form the positive cast.
Here, too, is a reversal of Alterations, whose small Hydrocal figures were a good deal less individuated than the women Cutler painted.
They are in fact cast-pigment and Hydrocal simulacra of paintings, and might reflect real world objects like a fractured flagstone or a wall seam where lathe meets wainscot.
Her large cast panels - she works them in clay and then casts them in Hydrocal, a strong plasterlike substance - have a look that's both ancient and contemporary.
Dene, SLI Lighting president, in the purchase, which includes the corporate offices and hydrocal, iron, and lamp shade production facility in Ellwood City, Pa.
Designed and developed specifically for specialty naphthenic lube oil production, the Hydrocal II high-pressure hydrotreating process features a computerized, distributed control system for precision control of the multi-stage catalytic reaction zones.
Elsewhere, Reclining Snowman, 2001, is a playful take on Minimalist formal conventions, as it features three white Hydrocal spheres of increasing scales unceremoniously arranged on a low Formica platform to evoke the subject of their title.
Mastercraft had particularly strong interest in its contemporary and transitional glass lamps, large brushed steel lamps, hurricanes and ceramic lamps in decorative finishes that resemble similar hydrocal looks.
Indeed, her use of Hydrocal, a white gypsum cement, evidences an emphasis on making that displaces, or at least forestalls, incursions of exogenous meaning--or meaning apart from finding, manipulating, and making.