hydride

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Related to Hydrides: Metal hydrides

hy·dride

(hī'drīd),
A negatively charged hydrogen (that is, H:-) or a compound of hydrogen in which it assumes a formal negative charge, for example, sodium borohydride (NaBH4).

hy·dride

(hī'drīd)
A negatively charged hydrogen (i.e., H:-) or a compound of hydrogen in which it assumes a formal negative charge.

hydride

(hī′drīd)
A chemical compound containing hydrogen and an element or radical.
References in periodicals archive ?
For many years, we have been studying the possibility to use complex metal hydrides as storage media, explains Dr Claudio Pistidda, materials researcher at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht and one of the authors of the current publication.
The activation energy of pure Mg-Fe hydrides ([Mg.sub.2]Fe[H.sub.6]) nanoparticles compound calculated from Kissinger plot as shown in the inset of Figure 5 is 159.8 [+ or -] 6.7 kJ/mol.
It's based on a complex chemical compound called a hydride that contains hydrogen, reports Discovery News.
Experiments with sodium alanate--a prototypical hydride that behaves like materials with a higher storage capability that are under investigation at HRL--have allowed researchers to study the engineering properties of storage materials and container design, and compare these to simulations and models.
In the first of the project's two phases, scientists and engineers will analyze various storage tank designs and components that are based around sodium aluminum hydride, aka sodium alanate.
A hydride storage system can be either mechanical, like a metal hydride cell, or a chemical storage system such as sodium boro-hydride.
Lipscomb also knew of smaller boron compounds that resembled other carbon molecules: For example, the eight-carbon cubane matches with a six-boron hydride ion.
From the above-mentioned researches, it can be found that metal hydrides have great potential as additive components for energetic materials.
Kim and colleagues used a metal hydride made from nickel, copper, calcium and manganese to hold the hydrogen.
"Our approach will be to focus on achieving or exceeding the DOE's hydrogen storage targets through novel materials development, supported by our strengths in fundamental and applied materials science," said Sandia analytical materials science department manager Jim Wang, who will serve as director of the metal hydride Center of Excellence.
A less familiar method of storing hydrogen is as a solid in metal hydrides, alloys of rare earth, transition metal, and magnesium.
Aluminium hydride is a very promising product for the enhancement of some important propulsive performances for solid or hybrid propulsion.