hydric

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hy·dric

(hī'drik),
Relating to hydrogen in chemical combination.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hy·dric

(hī'drik)
Relating to hydrogen in chemical combination.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These problematic conditions included sites where vascular plant species occurrences were nearly identical in uplands and wetlands and the differences were in the presence or absence of hydric soils and hydrology indicators.
Interaction: Hydric soil and water table more than 6 ft from the soil surface.
The soils considered herein for evaluating the criteria are poorly drained or very poorly drained hydric soils with sandy loam or sandy clay loam texture in the surface layers.
Hydric soils abutting exposed waters were examined for the presence of gleyed phases (Munsell Charts[R], 1992).
In these settings, the materials are leached of calcium carbonate but the iron has not undergone the redoximorphic depletion typically observed in gleyed hydric soils. Water movement has been exclusively through fractures and along varved bedding planes for approximately 700,000 years, indicating that in these settings, matrix flow is not occurring.
Hydrophytic vegetation, hydric soils, and periodic flooding are three characteristics of wetlands.
Similar problems occur when using the presence of hydric soils or halophytic plants to define tidally influenced habitat, since both can occur in seasonal wetlands far removed from tidal influence (Ferren et al.
The terms used reflect the lack of hydrogeological studies and of data about dominant aquatic vegetation and hydric soils. The terms are mere translations from the English.
A wetland site 1) has a predominance of hydric soils; 2) is inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support a prevalence of hydrophytic vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions; and 3) under normal circumstances does support a prevalence of such vegetation.
* Wetlands possess hydric soils, defined as soils that are saturated, flooded, or ponded long enough during the growing season to develop anaerobic conditions in the upper part.