Roe v. Wade

(redirected from Hyde amendment)
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A landmark case presented before the US Supreme Court in 1973, which was instrumental in legalising abortion in the US

Roe v. Wade

Obstetrics A 'landmark' case presented before the US Supreme Court in 1973, which was instrumental in legalizing abortion
References in periodicals archive ?
210) The Supreme Court's interpretation of the civil rights law standard in Christiansburg ostensibly supports the conclusion that the Hyde Amendment is an objective rather than a subjective standard.
Even before the Hyde Amendment, an estimated 133,000 Medicaid-eligible women-about a third of the 427,000 women estimated to be in need of subsidized abortion services-were unable to obtain a publicly funded abortion, (119) because the services were not available or accessible to them or because the states had policies prohibiting coverage.
Since the Hyde Amendment expanded federal funding for Medicaid to cover abortion in cases of rape and incest, they say states must now provide those services to poor women.
3) For him, as well as other supporters of the so-called 50-state strategy, this middle ground includes abandoning a push to repeal the Hyde Amendment that prohibits Medicaid and other government-funded health programs from paying for most abortions.
The Hyde Amendment prohibits tax dollars from paying for abortion except in cases of rape, incest or threat to the woman's life.
Since that time, the Hyde Amendment has severely restricted abortion coverage for women insured by Medicaid and, in turn, has made real reproductive choice a privilege of those who can afford it, rather than a fundamental right.
The Act would repeal the Hyde Amendment and ensure women have access to abortion care regardless of where they live or how much they make (see our Feature Article for more on the bill.
For years, federal laws have restricted the use of government funds to pay for abortions - except in cases of rape, incest or when a woman's life is endangered - through the Hyde Amendment, named for a legislator who opposed abortion in all circumstances.
Donna Harrison, president of the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists, said that the amendment merely codifies another piece of legislation, known as the Hyde Amendment, as part of health care reform.
7) The Hyde Amendment allows prevailing criminal defendants with private counsel to collect "a reasonable attorney's fee and other litigation expenses, where the court finds that the position of the United States was vexatious, frivolous, or in bad faith.
An immediate Catholic backlash then ensued, followed by a right-wing Pandora's box that unleashed a host of ills resulting in parental/spouse notification, informed consent, licensing restrictions, and the dread Hyde Amendment denying Medicaid funding of abortions for the poor.
Commonly known as the Hyde Amendment after their 1976 sponsor, Rep.