hydatid

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hydatid

 [hi´dah-tid]
2. any cystlike structure.
hydatid disease an infection, usually of the liver, caused by larval forms (hydatid cysts) of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, and characterized by the development of expanding cysts. In the infection caused by E. granulosus, single or multiple cysts that are unilocular in character are formed, and in that caused by E. multilocularis, the host's tissues are invaded and destroyed as the cysts enlarge by peripheral budding. Called also echinococcosis.
hydatid of Morgagni a cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct attached to a testis or fallopian tube.
sessile hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a testis.
stalked hydatid the hydatid of Morgagni connected with a fallopian tube.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·da·tid

(hī'da-tid), Avoid the mispronunciation hydat'id. Do not confuse this word with hydatoid.
1. Synonym(s): hydatid cyst
2. A vesicular structure resembling an Echinococcus cyst.
[G. hydatis, a drop of water, a hyatid]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hydatid

(hī′də-tĭd)
n.
1. A cyst formed as a result of infestation by larvae of an echinococcus tapeworm.
2. The encysted larva of such a tapeworm.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hy·da·tid

(hī'dă-tid)
1. Synonym(s): hydatid cyst.
2. A vesicular structure resembling an Echinococcus cyst.
[G. hydatis, a drop of water, a hyatid]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hydatid

(hid'a-tid) [Gr. hydatis, watery vesicle]
Enlarge picture
HYDATID CYST: (orig. mag. ×500)
1. A cyst formed in the tissues, esp. the liver, from the development of the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus (one of the species of the dog tapeworm). The cyst develops slowly, forming a hollow bladder from the inner surface of which hollow brood capsules are formed. These may be attached to the mother cyst by slender stalks or may fall free into the fluid-filled cavity of the mother cyst. Scolices form on the inner surface of the older brood capsules. Older cysts have a granular deposit of brood capsules and scolices called hydatid sand. Hydatids may grow for years, sometimes to an enormous size. lbendazole, mebendazole, and praziquantel have been used to treat the disease. The cyst should be removed surgically or percutaneously drained. See: illustration; : echinococcosis
2. A small cystic remnant of an embryonic structure. See: choriocarcinoma; hydatid mole

hydatid of Morgagni

A cystlike remnant of the müllerian duct attached to the fallopian tube.

sessile hydatid

Morgagnian hydatid connected with a testicle.

stalked hydatid

Morgagnian hydatid connected with a fallopian tube.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydatid cysts may erode into the great vessels, e.g.
CT thorax suggestive of 5.5 x 5 cm, well defined hydatid cyst in right lower Lobe of lung and 8.6 x 8 x 7 cm splenic hydatid cyst.
INTRODUCTION: Hydatid disease has plaqued mankind from its very origin.
* To study the different diagnostic modalities of hydatid disease of liver.
Minimal change glomerulonephritis associated with hydatid disease.
Splenic hydatid disease is usually an accidentally discovered mass in the abdomen mostly in left hypochondrium and less frequently in the epigastrium.
Calcification occurs in <1% of the brain hydatid cysts.
solium cysticercosis did not affect hydatid serologic assay results.
The preoperative diagnosis of hydatid disease is veiy important as to limit the risk of anaphylactic shock and dissemination of rotoscoliosis during surgery, if the cyst is accidentally opened or ruptured.
Between January 2014 and June 2015, 60 patients with liver hydatid disease underwent surgery in the hospital; 30 patients in group I underwent laparoscopic surgery and 30 patients in group II underwent open surgery.
Cerebral hydatid cysts are extremely rare, forming only 2% of all intracranial space-occupying lesions.