hurricane

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A meteorologic event characterised by highly destructive winds with speeds of 210 km/hr—130 mph—or more, heavy rains, and tidal surges, causing floods that once claimed most lives—reduced by early warning systems; hurricanes occur in the tropical zones of the North Atlantic or Pacific Ocean and are classified by severity on a scale of 1 to 5

hurricane

Geological medicine A natural disaster characterized by highly destructive winds with speeds of 210 km/hr–130 mph or more, heavy rains, and tidal surges, causing floods that once claimed most lives–reduced by early warning systems; hurricanes occurs in the tropical zones of North Atlantic or Pacific Oceans and are classified by severity on a scale of 1 to 5
References in periodicals archive ?
There have been no officially recorded June or off-season Category 5 hurricanes.
As the peak of the 2019 hurricane season is underway, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) updated its forecast to predict five to nine hurricanes in the Atlantic before the end of November.
Forecasters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who are monitoring oceanic and atmospheric patterns say with the demise of El Nino this summer, conditions are now more favorable for above-normal named storm activity for the rest of the hurricane season.
On average, NOAA said the Atlantic hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which six become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.
CFO Jimmy Patronis said, With so many false storm facts floating around in the wake of Hurricane Michael, I want to set the record straight for Floridians.
The damage caused by hurricanes that hit the United States between 2004 and 2013.
Last week on October 10, Hurricane Michael made landfall in Mexico Beach, Florida.
June to November is the peak period for the formation of tropical storms and hurricanes. On an average, a season sees at least 12 named storms, of which six would turn into hurricanes and three into major hurricanes.
To learn more about hurricanes, check out NASA Space Place: https://spaceplace.nasa.qov/hurricanes/
Related: Top lawmakers call on Congress to pass hurricane relief bill
* A hurricane can drop over 2 trillion gallons of drenching rain a day and can have ferocious, roaring 180-mph winds!
MIAMI, May 27, 2016 - The coming Atlantic hurricane season is forecast to be ''near-normal,'' after three years of unusually low storm activity due in part to the El Nino ocean warming trend, US government scientists said Friday.