Hantavirus

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Related to Hunta virus: Ebola, Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Hantavirus

 [han´tah-vi″rus]
a genus of viruses that cause epidemic hemorrhagic fever or pneumonia in humans, who are probably infected by contact with the waste products of rodents.

Han·ta·vi·rus

(han'tā-vī'rŭs),
A genus of Bunyaviridae responsible for pneumonia and hemorrhagic fevers. At least seven members of the genus are thus far recognized: Hantaan, Puumala, Seoul, Prospect Hill, Thailand, Thottapalayam, and Sin Nombre viruses. Other species have not been classified as yet. Hantaan virus causes Korean hemorrhagic fever. Various rodent species are the asymptomatic carriers of these viruses, which are shed in saliva, urine, and feces. Human infection is direct, or by the respiratory route from contaminated specimens; person-to-person spread is thought to be rare. An outbreak of hantavirus infection, the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), causing severe and often fatal pulmonary symptoms was identified in the Four-Corners region of the Southwestern U.S. in 1993 and the agent was subsequently named Sin Nombre virus.

hantavirus

(hăn′tə-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a genus of single-stranded RNA viruses carried by rodents that cause disease in humans, especially a type of hemorrhagic fever that involves kidney failure (known as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome) and a severe respiratory disease (known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome).

hantavirus

Epidemiology A zoonotic virus of the family Bunyaviridae; it is spherical, ±100 nm in diameter, has a single RNA strand in 3 segments surrounded by a lipid envelope, destroyed by lipid solvents–eg, alcohol, disinfectants, bleach Vector Deer mouse, caused “4 Corners” outbreak; other HVs cause pulmonary Sx–Black Creek Canal virus, Florida Vector Cotton rat; Bayou virus, Louisiana Vector Rice rat; NY-1 virus, New York Vector White-footed mouse

Han·ta·vi·rus

(hahn'tă-vī'rŭs)
A genus of Bunyaviridae responsible for pneumonia and hemorrhagic fevers. Four members of the genus are recognized thus far: Hantaan, Puumala, Seoul, and Prospect Hill; the first three are known human pathogens, and Hantaan virus causes Korean hemorrhagic fever. Various rodent species are the asymptomatic carriers of these viruses, which are shed in saliva, urine, and feces. Human infection is direct, or by the respiratory route from contaminated specimens; person-to-person spread has not been demonstrated. Affected people may have a mild to fatal course. The most seriously ill have hemorrhagic fevers accompanied by renal failure and sometimes respiratory collapse. This virus was isolated from patients in Arizona and New Mexico in 1992.