humic acid

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humic acid

A heteropolymeric mixture of organic molecules from biodegradable humis, peat and soil.

humic acid

the precipitate resulting from the addition of acid to a solution of HUMUS. Black in colour, it is insoluble in acids and organic solvents.
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Chemical composition of the worm leachate Item Concentration/value Total humic acids (mg/L) 0.
From Figure 2 it is clear that most of the oil and application of humic acid was obtained in 80% of field capacity and high stress levels, the lowest percentage of oil (Fc 60%) in the general application of humic acid in water levels, essential oil percentage was more related to stress levels, according to the above table we can say that the stress levels (60 and 80 percent Fc) And in compliance with applicable water saving compost and manure can be a reasonable percentage of the oil produced while the level of 80% humic acid can also be used to produce a good performance.
Quantitative estimation of peat, brown coal and lignite humic acids using chemical parameters, 1H-NMR and DTA analyses.
Gondar D, Iglesias A, Lopez R, Fiol S, Antelo JM, Arce F (2006a) Copper binding by peat fulvic and humic acids extracted from two horizons of an ombrotrophic peat bog.
The team mixed silver ions with humic acid from a variety of sources at different temperatures and concentrations and found that acids from river water or sediments would form detectable silver nanoparticles at room temperature in as little as two to four days.
Adsorption isotherms of dissolved humic acid on mineral particles with different particle sizes
Comparison of the UV-B protective effect of natural peat humic acids and para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA).
Samples were placed in hot (70[degrees]C) 2 M HCI to remove carbonates, rinsed several times with deionized water, placed in hot NaOH to remove humic acids (weathering products of organic matter that can result in erroneous in [sup.
The natural (swamp) water and the water samples containing commercial humic acids generally had significantly higher chromium and copper content from wood leaching losses (Table 1).