whipworm

(redirected from Human whipworm)
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Related to Human whipworm: trichuriasis, whipworm infection, Trichuris trichiura

whipworm

 [hwip´werm]
any nematode of the genus Trichuris.

Trich·u·ris trich·i·u·'ra

the whipworm of humans, a species that causes trichuriasis; the body is filiform and slender in the anterior three fifths, and more robust posteriorly; females are 4 or 5 cm long, males are shorter (with coiled caudal extremity and a single eversible spicule); eggs are barrel-shaped, 50-56 mcm by 20-22 mcm, with double shell and translucent knobs at each of the two poles; humans are the only susceptible hosts and usually acquire infection by direct finger-to-mouth contact or by ingestion of soil, water, or food that contains larvated eggs (development in the soil takes 3-6 weeks under proper conditions of warmth and moisture, hence distribution is chiefly tropical); larvae escape from eggs in the ileum, mature in approximately a month, and then pass directly into the cecum without undergoing a parenteral migration as occurs with Ascaris lumbricoides; adults may persist for 2-7 years.

whipworm

/whip·worm/ (-werm) any nematode of the genus Trichuris.

whipworm

(wĭp′wûrm′, hwĭp′-)
n.
Any of several slender, whip-shaped, parasitic nematode worms of the genus Trichuris that infest the intestines of mammals, especially T. trichiura, which causes trichuriasis in humans.

whipworm

Whipworm

A nematode worm of the family Trichuridae with a body that is thick at one end and very long and slender at the other end.

whipworm