sexual response

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A biochemical and physiological response to sexual stimulation that occurs in men and women after puberty

sexual response

Gynecology A biochemical and physiological response to sexual stimulation that occurs in ♂ and ♀ after puberty Phases Excitement, plateau, orgasm, resolution
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Their data, which was the only reliable data in the field, served as the basis for their first book, and national bestseller, Human Sexual Response.
In their paper, Margolese and Assalian review published studies which examine the sexual side effects of antidepressant drugs on the libido, excitement, and orgasm phases of human sexual response.
Pleasure is intricately woven into human sexual response.
at a recent conference on "Emerging Concepts in Women's Health," sexology has pursued a path of treating male and female functioning as similar, as evidenced by Masters and Johnson's development of the human sexual response cycle.
Masters and Johnson described the human sexual response as a linear process of distinct phases of excitement, arousal, orgasm and resolution.
MASTERS OF SEX (Channel 4, Tuesday, 9pm) SET in the 1950s, the drama continues to chronicle American gynaecologist William Masters' pioneering research with Virginia Johnson into the nature of human sexual response.
The programme documents American gynecologist William Masters' pioneering research with Virginia Johnson into the nature of human sexual response.
The human sexual response has been defined as a three-stage cycle: Desire; Arousal; Orgasm [2].
Part I considers the birth of William Masters and Virginia Johnson's theory of the human sexual response cycle in the 1960s, a theory which included both an innovative view of female sexuality and identification of what the researchers called "sexual dysfunction," a term they coined.
of Technology, Sydney) presents a sociological analysis and critique of the conceptual foundations and practice of William Masters and Virginia Johnson's (1966; 1970) scientific sex research and its clinical applications within the field of sex therapy, as articulated in their texts Human Sexual Response and Human Sexual Inadequacy.
In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) called homosexuality a "normal human sexual response.
If the reader agrees with Benemann that human sexual response has not changed very much in the past 250 years, then his arguments about intimate relations between men seem more than plausible.

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