migration

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mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn),
1. Passing from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
2. Synonym(s): diapedesis
3. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
4. Movement of molecules during electrophoresis, centrifugation, or diffusion.
[L. migro, pp. -atus, to move from place to place]

migration

/mi·gra·tion/ (mi-gra´shun)
1. an apparently spontaneous change of place, as of symptoms.

migration

[mīgrā′shən]
Etymology: L, migrare, to wander
the passage of the ovum from the ovary into a fallopian tube and then into the uterus.

migration

Informatics
The process of moving an information system and/or software—including data—from an old to new operational environment in accordance with a software quality system.

Genetics
The movement of one or more individuals between reproductively isolated populations. 

Vox populi
Movement of one or more animals from point A to point B; as in, the migration of birds.

mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn)
1. Passage from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
2. Synonym(s): diapedesis.
3. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
4. Movement of molecules during electrophoresis.
5. Geographic spread of disease-causing agents, rectors, or populations.
[L. migro, pp.-atus, to move from place to place]

migration

any cyclical movements (usually annual) that occur during the life history of an animal at definite intervals, and always including a return trip from where they began. The exact derivation of the word is from the Latin ‘migrate’ meaning to go from one place to another, but biologically a return journey is part of the accepted definition of the term, the outward journey being termed EMIGRATION and the inward journey IMMIGRATION.

mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn)
1. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
2. Passing from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
[L. migro, pp.-atus, to move from place to place]

migration

movement of living things from one place to another by their own volition. Also used to describe movement of nonliving biological material, e.g. migration of protein in electrophoretic media.

migration inhibition factor
see leukocyte migration-inhibition factor, macrophage inhibition factor, migration inhibition test (below).
migration inhibition test
an in vitro test for detection of cell-mediated immunity (or delayed hypersensitivity) in which peritoneal exudate cells (lymphocytes and macrophages) are packed in capillary tubes and placed in a medium; if the medium contains an antigen to which the lymphocytes are primed, macrophage migration from the tubes is inhibited by lymphokines, particularly macrophage inhibiting factor, released by the antigen stimulated lymphocytes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Migration in History: Human Migration in Comparative Perspective.
Two-page color maps show environmental hotspots such as degraded forests and watersheds, protected ecosystems, and transboundary issues including water resources, human migration, and the movement of pests and diseases.
The closing keynote speaker, Spencer Wells, spoke about population genetics and human migration, as it traces our shared ancestry as humans and connects the world's populations.
I intend to approach my subject more from the unorthodox perspective of my empirical knowledge of the problems than from the traditional standpoint of reliance on existing scholarships on the subject, focusing solely on the internal rather than the international factors of human migration.
Researchers have found evidence that the land bridge between Alaska and Siberia--believed to be the major route for human migration from Asia to the Americas--may have been cut off about 1,000 years earlier than widely thought.
Dr Francois Balloux, a scientist at Cambridge University, said: "The research also opens up new possibilities for understanding early human migration.
I wish it were equally plain for all to see that human migration in general can create triple gains--for migrants, for their countries of origin and for the societies that receive them.
This research examines how commonly available data describing socioeconomic, demographic, and land-use development conditions from the regional to local levels can be used to measure and visualize various phenomena of human migration and, in turn, be used to focus the efforts of planners, land managers, decisionmakers, and researchers on geographic areas both currently experiencing and anticipated to experience the continuing and increasing effects of the human presence on the landscape.
Until recently it was thought that HERVs were ubiquitous and fixed in the population, having been incorporated into the genome before the initial wave of human migration out of Africa some 200,000 years ago.
Hoerder's last chapter reiterates his conviction that a "systems approach" with sensitivity to human agency best elucidates the complex processes and levels of human migration.
Human migration is one of many factors at work in the Cienega Valley.
Those numbers--and how they affect life on this planet--will be greatly affected by how we deal with gender, poverty, access to health care, and other factors, including human migration.

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