natural language

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language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.

natural language

Language as used in ordinary verbal and written communication among humans, as distinguished from controlled vocabularies and structured languages used exclusively for communicating and interoperability among information systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
This decline in phoneme usage cannot be explained by demographic shifts or other local factors, and it provides strong evidence for an African origin of modern human languages -- as well as parallel mechanisms that slowly shaped both genetic and linguistic diversity among humans.
This means that human language provides infants with a powerful key: it unlocks for them a broader world of social intentions," Waxman said.
A key feature of human language is the use of suffixes or prefixes at the end or beginning of words to add extra meaning.
Moreover, gestural communication in apes shares some key features with human language, such as intentionality, referential properties and flexibility of learning and use," they added.
Many scientists, inspired largely by linguist Noam Chomsky of MIT, see no biological precedents for the brain structures governing human language.
Patterns of dolphin behaviour at the surface obey the same law of brevity as human language, with both seeking out the simplest and most efficient codes", RamAon Ferrer i Cancho, co-author of the study published in the journal Complexity and a researcher in the Department of Languages and IT Systems at the UPC, tells SINC.
Linguist Yule takes on the questions of the first-time student, covering the origins of language, animals and human language, the development of writing, the sounds and sound patterns of language, words and word formation, morphology, grammar in phrases and sentences, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis, language and the brain, first and second language acquisition, body language, language history and change, regional variation and language within culture.
Chimps often volley calls back and forth in succession between groups, Boehm notes, indicating "a two-way conversational aspect [with] some similarity to human language.
British academic Geoffrey Sampson offers an enlarged and updated version of a text originally published in 1997, in which he challenges Noam Chomsky's (linguistics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) theory of an innate, biologically determined system specific to human beings which provides a normal child with a vast body of a priori knowledge about the nature of any human language.
In any human language, there are certain things that native speakers, even without the prompting of a schoolteacher, naturally and readily identify as grammatical.
American scientists have developed an artificial intelligence interpreter of the language of hens to human language, the Life website reported.