consciousness

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consciousness

 [kon´shus-nes]
1. the state of being conscious; fully alert, aware, oriented, and responsive to the environment.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. in psychoanalysis, the conscious.
5. in Newman's conceptual model, health as expanding consciousness, the informational capacity of the human system, or its capacity for interacting with the environment; consciousness is considered to be coextensive with the universe, residing in all matter.
clouding of consciousness see clouding of consciousness.
levels of consciousness
1. an early freudian concept referring to the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious.
2. the somewhat loosely defined states of awareness of and response to stimuli, generally considered an integral component of the assessment of an individual's neurologic status. Levels of consciousness range from full consciousness (behavioral wakefulness, orientation as to time, place, and person, and a capacity to respond appropriately to stimuli) to deep coma (complete absence of response).

Consciousness depends upon close interaction between the intact cerebral hemispheres and the central gray matter of the upper brainstem. Although the hemispheres contribute most of the specific components of consciousness (memory, intellect, and learned responses to stimuli), there must be arousal or activation of the cerebral cells before they can function. For this reason, it is suggested that a detailed description of the patient's response to specific auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli will be more meaningful to those concerned with neurologic assessment than would the use of such terms as alert, drowsy, stuporous, semiconscious, or other equally subjective labels. Standardized systems, such as the glasgow coma scale, aid in objective and less ambiguous evaluation of levels of consciousness.

Examples of the kinds of stimuli that may be used to determine a patient's responsiveness as a measure of consciousness include calling him by name, producing a sharp noise, giving simple commands, gentle shaking, pinching the biceps, and application of a blood pressure cuff. Responses to stimuli should be reported in specific terms relative to how the patient responded, whether the response was appropriate, and what occurred immediately after the response.

con·scious·ness

(con'shŭs-nes),
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

/con·scious·ness/ (-nes)
1. the state of being conscious.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. the conscious.

consciousness

(kŏn′shəs-nĭs)
n.
1. The state or condition of being conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the conscious.

consciousness

[kon′shəsnes]
a clear state of awareness of self and the environment in which attention is focused on immediate matters, as distinguished from mental activity of an unconscious or subconscious nature.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

Full awareness of self and of one's environment. The conviction that it is possible to explain the sources of consciousness has spawned a small library of books purporting to do so.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
State of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness,

n a state in which the individual is capable of rational response to questioning and has all protective reflexes intact, including the ability to maintain a patent airway.

consciousness

the state of being conscious; responsiveness of the brain to impressions made by the senses. Altered states range from the normal, complete alertness to depression, confusion, delirium and finally loss of consciousness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mind Science Foundation has sponsored groundbreaking brain imaging research on TV Violence and Children; the seminal 2003 MIT conference with the Dalai Lama, "Investigating the Mind"; lectures by scientific luminaries from Jonas Salk to Deepak Chopra and Jane Goodall; and the annual Tom Slick Research Awards in Consciousness for scientists and physicians conducting innovative research focused on the mind/brain and human consciousness.
Yet the cliche of a mad scientist using machines to stimulate human consciousness no longer seems like pure science fiction.
In describing the necessary interaction between the observer and what is being observed, and how the state of a system is determined by the act of its measurement, they inadvertently left the impression that human consciousness enters the picture to cause that state to come into being.
The Mind Science Foundation is dedicated to supporting scientific research and education about human consciousness.
This act of introspection-or "thinking about your thinking"-is a key aspect of human consciousness, though scientists have noted plenty of variation in peoples' abilities to introspect.
This work analyzes six science fiction novels as a means of warning about the dangers of posthumanism (the potentialities of biological-technical hybrids) for human consciousness, particularly the pure consciousness of Vedic philosophy, which is a consciousness with no objects of thought and, through transcendental meditation, is thought by the author to be of greater value to health and well-being than promised posthuman transformations.
An heretofore unknown star in its relationship to the sun has had a profound influence on human consciousness and on our planet.
The puzzling world of human consciousness is probed in Brief Tour Of Human Consciousness by Dr.
Fernandez Santamaria goes on to hold that for Vives society is a creation that would have been unnecessary prior to the fall, and that it is the result of clear human consciousness "of both the shortcomings attendant to his new [post-lap-sarian] conditions and the weakness to which he had now become prey" (15).
This book acts as a guide and describes development of human consciousness and explains how society's consciousness has been lead toward the goals of wealth and power rather than the simple enjoyment of life and love.
Or if an Orange County road trip seems too far, take an odyssey to the furthest-flung corners of human consciousness without ever leaving L.
Dennett compares human consciousness to an evolved "virtual machine," a sort of computer software program that shapes the activities of its hardware -- the brain.

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