Human Tissue Act 1961

Human Tissue Act 1961

A UK Parliamentary Act which made provision with respect to the use of parts of bodies of deceased persons for therapeutic purposes and purposes of medical education and research, and with respect to the circumstances in which post-mortem examinations could be carried out, and permitted the cremation of bodies removed for anatomic examination. The Act was repealed and revoked, and its relevant provisions pulled forward into the Human Tissue Act 2004.
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It replaced the Human Tissue Act 1961, the Anatomy Act 1984 and the Human Organ Transplants Act 1989.
Human Tissue Act:In the UK, the law regarding removal of organs from people after their death is set out in the Human Tissue Act 1961.
The Human Tissue Act 1961 (HTA) be amended to provide a test of fully informed consent for the lawful post-mortem examination and retention of body parts.
The retention of body parts after a post mortem examination is governed by two pieces of legislation - the Human Tissue Act 1961 and the Coroners Rules 1984.
The Government's Chief Medical Officer is also scathing of the Human Tissue Act 1961 covering the removal of body parts for medical purposes.
Mr Collender told the hearing that in some cases consent to the removal of the children's organs had not been obtained from their parents, going against rules set out in the Human Tissue Act 1961.
It was born out of the Bristol Royal Infirmary and the Alder Hey scandals and will repeal and replace the Human Tissue Act 1961, the Anatomy Act 1984 and the Human Organ Transplants Act 1989.
A Department of Health spokesman confirmed there was a statutory countrywide scheme launched under the Human Tissue Act 1961 'which allowed pituitary glands to be taken from cadavers and used in the production of human growth hormone'.
The Human Tissue Act 1961 is criticised by transplant surgeons as being "unsatisfactory, ambiguous and in need of reform".

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