Huang Di

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Huang Di

, Huang Ti (hwong dē) [Chinese huáng dì, Yellow Emperor (his official title)]
Semilegendary ruler of China who traditionally reigned ca. 2695–2597 B.C.). He is regarded as the founder of Chinese civilization. He supposedly wrote or caused to be written a book on internal medicine that forms the basis of traditional Chinese medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
(10) Whereas the Emperor tries to abolish the past, destroying the books and closing himself in a palace-labyrinth where there were "tantas habitaciones como hay dias en el ano" (Obras 2: 11); he metaphorically reconstructs it in building a wall: "Acaso Shih Huang Ti amurallo el imperio porque sabia que este era deleznable y destruyo los libros por entender que eran libros sagrados, o sea libros que ensenan lo que ensena el universo o la conciencia de cada hombre" (Obras 2: 12).
Indeed, the narrator's meditations in "The Wall and the Books" appear in response to his readings: "Lei, dias pasados, que el hombre que ordeno la edificacion de la casi infinita muralla china rue aquel Primer Emperador, Shin Huang Ti, que asimismo dispuso que se quemaron todos los libros anteriores a el.
Emperor Huang Ti sent a scholar named Ling Lun to the far western mountains to find bamboo sticks suitable for making the finest lute possible.
a new dynasty began to rule over China, the Ch'in, the first emperor of that dynasty being Shih Huang Ti (259-210 B.C.).
The Chinese lunar calendar is the longest chronological record in history, dating from 2637 when the Emperor Huang Ti introduced the first cycle of this zodiac in the 61st year of his reign.
Born into an aristocratic family in Ch'in, he entered that state's army and rose to general; waged several brilliantly successful campaigns under Shih Huang Ti to unify China under the Ch'in (230-222); continued to serve Shih Huang Ti after he became Emperor (222), and led expeditions to expand the area of Chinese rule; suppressed a serious peasant rebellion in the disorders surrounding Shih Huang Ti's death (210-209); led an ill-prepared army of 200,000 against a huge army assembled by the rebel Hsiang Yu, and was forced to surrender, after which he was buried alive with his men (207).
Los investigadores de la historia de China sostienen que el calendario conocido como Huang-li ("almanaque amarillo") tiene mas de 20 siglos de antiguedad, dado que ya era conocido en epocas de Shi Huang Ti, primer emperador de ese pais (goberno entre los anos 247 y 210 antes de Cristo).