head-related transfer function

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head-related transfer function

Abbreviation: HRTF
A mathematical representation of the ways in which the positions of the head, trunk, and ears filter sounds, altering the way they are perceived.
Synonym: anatomical transfer function
See also: function
References in periodicals archive ?
PHRTF: Efficient personalized HRTF computation for high-fidelity spatial sound.
We have shown that the ambiguous interpretation of the HRTF phase data is probably the reason for the oscillatory behaviour of MAA as a function of frequency in human performance.
Distance to objects is Simulator encoded by the amplitude for Audio of sound Visually- Depth image map is Impaired converted into an audio People map by using the HRTF Top/bottom position- frequency of sound The Vibe audio (low/high pitch) Left/right position- left/right panning The color of objects is encoded by musical See Color Audio instruments sounds Distance is encoded by the length of sound Top/bottom position- The Voice Audio frequency of sound (low/high pitch) Tactile matrix that enables Kinect for Haptic users to perceive the depth the blind of objects Distance is encoded by Real- sound frequency (low/high Time pitch) Assistance Audio 3D directional sound by Prototype using the Head Related Visual- Commercial Aid Addressability deviec System VR.
The synthesis stage can also be easily implemented in real time since its main operation is amplitude panning (or HRTF filtering for binaural reproduction).
(103.) Press Release, HRTF & CCHR, supra note 3 (quoting the
As one might expect, the most effective 3-D simulation is usually obtained using HRTFs that take into account the unique anatomy of the listener, including the size of the listener's head and the shape of the pinnae.
The HRTF revenues are required to be paid into the Commonwealth treasury and credited to the HRTF on a monthly basis, subject to appropriation by the general assembly.
Additionally, the iMix 5.1 Monitor works with any type of headphone, including open-backed, closed-back, in-ear or ear buds without the need for individual HRTF calibration or special setup.
It also includes an external Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab HRTF (head-related transfer function) library (Gardner & Martin, 1994) to increase the accuracy of the final localization.
Although spatial audio technology was used as early as World War I to aid in the detection of enemy aircraft (see Wenzel, 1992, for a brief history), it was not until the 1980s -- after the development of powerful digital signal processors and head-related transfer function (HRTF) filtering techniques -- that virtual spatial audio displays could be generated in real time for headphone presentation.