Howell-Jolly bodies


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

How·ell-Jol·ly bod·ies

(how'ĕl zhō-lē'),
spheric or ovoid eccentrically located granules, approximately 1 mcm in diameter, occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes, especially in stained preparations (as compared with wet unstained films); probably represent nuclear remnants, staining with dyes that are rather specific for chromatin; the significance of the bodies is not exactly known; they occur most frequently after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia.
Synonym(s): Jolly bodies

How·ell-Jol·ly bo·dies

(how'ĕl zhō-lē' bod'ēz)
Spheric or ovoid eccentrically located granules, approximately 1 mcm in diameter, occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia.

Howell,

William, U.S. physiologist, 1860-1945.
Howell-Jolly bodies - spherical or ovoid eccentrically located granules occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes that occur most frequently after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia. Synonym(s): Jolly bodies
Howell unit - equivalent approximately to 0.002 mg of pure heparin. Synonym(s): heparin unit

Jolly,

Justin, French histologist, 1870-1953.
Howell-Jolly bodies - see under Howell
Jolly bodies - Synonym(s): Howell-Jolly bodies
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyposplenism, as supported by the detection of Howell-Jolly bodies, may have also contributed to the severity of infection, but the cause of hyposplenism remains unknown.
Howell-Jolly bodies showing signs of hemolytic anemia or an affected spleen; also polycromasia and microcytes, which occur in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).
Abdominal ultrasonography showed a normal spleen and there was no evidence of Howell-Jolly bodies in his peripheral blood.
The instrument would not detect any red-cell inclusions, such as Howell-Jolly bodies, basophilic stippling, and Pappenheimer bodies.
Abnormalities in neutrophil counts or cycling, lymphocyte counts, or platelet size and counts, and the presence of Howell-Jolly bodies may suggest immune defects.
Section II discusses the specifics of grading individual red blood cell abnormalities and defines a grading system described in words and images for anisocytosis, poikilocytosis, microcytosis, macrocytosis, hypochromia, polychromasia, blister cells, target cells, teardrop cells, schistocytes, sickle cells, spherocytes, acanthocytes, echinocytes, elliptocytes, stomatocytes, Howell-Jolly bodies, basophilic stippling, Pappenheimer bodies, rouleaux, and agglutination.