invasion

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in·va·sion

(in-vā'zhŭn),
1. The beginning or incursion of a disease.
2. Local spread of a malignant neoplasm by infiltration or destruction of adjacent tissue; for epithelial neoplasms, invasion signifies infiltration beneath the epithelial basement membrane.
3. Entrance of foreign cells into a tissue, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation.
[L. invasio, fr. in-vado, pp. -vasus, to go into, attack]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

invasion

(ĭn-vā′zhən)
n.
The entry into bodily tissue and subsequent proliferation of an injurious entity, such as a pathogen or tumor.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

invasion

Oncology The penetration of a basement membrane and extension into the stroma by a neoplasm which usually, but not invariably, implies a malignancy with metastatic potential. See Bulldozing invasion, Lymph node inclusions, Metastasis, Perineural invasion, Pseudoinvasion, Stabbing invasion, Vascular invasion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·va·sion

(in-vā'zhŭn)
1. The beginning or incursion of a disease.
2. Local spread of a malignant neoplasm by infiltration or destruction of adjacent tissue; for epithelial neoplasms, invasion signifies infiltration beneath the epithelial basement membrane.
3. Entrance of foreign cells into a tissue, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation.
[L. invasio, fr. in-vado, pp. -vasus, to go into, attack]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

invasion

the entry and colonization of a host by an organism.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·va·sion

(in-vā'zhŭn)
1. Beginning or incursion of disease.
2. Local spread of a malignant neoplasm by infiltration or destruction of adjacent tissue.
3. Entrance of foreign cells into tissue.
[L. invasio, fr. in-vado, pp. -vasus, to go into, attack]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about invasion

Q. How successful s minimally invasive surgery for knee replacements?

A. Approximately 300,000 knee replacements are performed each year in the United States. and it said that 90% of the people who had a total knee replacement report an improvement in their function. i searched the CDC statistics for failure of the surgery and couldn't find any info about it. but as i said- it's a very common surgery. my grandmother had a hip joint replacement due to arthritis, it helped.
here is something that might help you to prepare for the surgery:

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00220#Understand the Procedure

good luck!!

Q. Has anyone had a minimally invasive partial knee replacement? How did it go and are you pleased? I will be having one in the next few weeks and would just like some input. Thanks...

A. Hmm... Never underwent it myself, but you may read some more here:
http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00405

and you may also watch it here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cm6_qxd3P3Q

Take care,

More discussions about invasion
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