hospice

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hospice

 [hos´pis]
originally, a medieval guest house or way station for pilgrims and travelers. The term is currently used to designate either a place or a philosophy of care for persons in the last stages of life and their families. For decades there have been hospices in England, free-standing facilities unaffiliated with hospitals and autonomous in terms of professional procedures. These hospices were the predecessors of the hospices now found in the United States.

A hospice program provides palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families. The concept of hospice is that of a caring community of professional and nonprofessional people, supplemented by volunteer services. The emphasis is on dealing with emotional and spiritual problems as well as medical problems. Of primary concern is control of pain and other symptoms, on keeping the patient at home for as long as possible or desirable, and on making his or her remaining days as comfortable and meaningful as possible. After the patient dies family members are given support throughout their period of bereavement.

hos·pice

(hos'pis),
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available in the home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

(hŏs′pĭs)
n.
1. A shelter or lodging for travelers, pilgrims, foundlings, or the destitute, especially one maintained by a monastic order.
2. A program that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional and spiritual needs of terminally ill patients at an inpatient facility or at the patient's home.

hospice

A residential or institutional palliative care unit in the UK which provides planned, co-ordinated, multidisciplinary care for the terminally ill and their carers. Hospices are often run by charitable organisations with which NHS Boards may have contractual arrangements for providing patient care.

Services provided
Inpatient and day care, home care, respite care and specialist advice.

Professions associated with hospices
Medical, nursing, allied health professionals, social work and chaplains/ministers of religion.

hospice

Managed care An institution which provides comfort care and a combination of inpatient, outpatient, and home health services–pain relief, symptom management and support, for terminally ill Pts (and their families) with CA, AIDS and other dread diseases. See Comfort care.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying patients and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available to provide assistance at home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

A hospital specializing in the care of the terminally ill. Hospices are dedicated to providing the physical, emotional and psychological support and expert pain management needed to help the dying to accept the reality of death and to die in dignity and peace of mind.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
Institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]
References in periodicals archive ?
For scarcely twenty-five days were they able to tolerate this: once more they burst forth and with the destructive violence of the mob, came to our hospitium armed with cudgels, and forced the house open through another gate.
For the particular form of Roman-Iberian hospitium, see Richardson (note 17, 1996) 156-58.
Under the common law an innkeeper was an insurer of property, infra hospitium [within the hotel facility], of his guests, and liable for the loss thereof or damage thereto unless the loss was caused by negligence of the guest, act of God, or the public enemy.
Realia sold one hotel property in Norrkoping for SEK31m and one in Karlstad for SEK24m, while at the same time acquiring four office and commercial properties in Mariestad from Hospitium Fastigheter for SEK26m.
LEE Cairney and Amy Stubbs, both of Billingham, tied the knot at St Cuthbert''s Church CAROLE Wood and David Gullon, both of Skelton said their vows at Rushpool Hall, Saltburn on October, 3, 2010 Photography by Sue Cowey Photography SARAH Elizabeth Fox and Guy Whatmore, both of Teesside became Mr and Mrs at Kirklevington Church OLIVER Williams and Rachael Reid, both of Hawkstone, Marton, were married at The Treebridge Hotel Picture by Denis Firman Photographic Catherine Shannon and Anthony Redman, both of Yarm, were married in Rome, Italy Picture by Photo Works ANTONY Lambert of Darlington and Zoe Barrett of Derby, right, were married at The Hospitium in York Museum Gardens Picture by 123 Photography
Robert Vander Poppen's 'A Festival of Laughter' creatively develops the theme of 'hospitium' (hospitality) that featured in Z.'s essay.
infra hospitium Meaning "within the inn." This doctrine states that under common law hotels were liable as insurers for guests' property on the hotel premises.