horsetail

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A branching shoot that contains alkaloids, flavonoids, minerals, saponins, silica, and tannins; it is antimicrobial, astringent, diuretic, and hemostatic, and has been used topically for cuts and internally to treat anemia, atherosclerosis, bedwetting, brittle nails and hair, fatigue, fractures, gastric ulcers, kidney stones, prostatitis, respiratory infections—e.g., tuberculosis—urinary tract infections, rheumatic complaints, and other conditions

horse·tail

(hōrs'tāl)
(Equisetum arvense) An herbal remedy purported to have value in wound healing and other internal uses; serious adverse reactions have been reported after its use.

horsetail

see EQUISETUM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Horsetails are homely, in contrast with all the flowering plants that surround them.
The stems of horsetails are "anatomically [...] unique among plants" (Niklas, 1997) (Fig.
Yn Japan mae'n nhw dal i ddefnyddio marchrawn y gaeaf (Equisetum hyemale; rough horsetail).
Otherwise, there was large variation among different species (Table 4), with high levels in horsetails, lousewort, and bottle sedge.
In the old days, people used horsetails for scouring metal pots and pans -- kind of the precursor to Brillo pads back in the day.
Modern versions of horsetails can be found today in the wet areas of Claybrookes Marsh, though they grow to only a fraction of the size of their ancestor.
Photo: Slippery slide leads to pool Slickened by water, this slide blends into a hillside of boulders, Southern sword ferns, and horsetails. The plastered slide was steel troweled to a glass-slick surface.
Underneath were the flowering shrubs, along with mushrooms, horsetails and ferns, according to Judith Totman Parrish of the University of Arizona at Tucson.
Tall horsetails (Equisetum hyemale) and zebra grass (Miscanthus sinensis 'Zebrinus') make a bog-like screen between the pool and a small hidden deck.
The materials in each Herbarium Constituent are listed in Mirra's nerdy but unequivocal language: "Equisetum arvense &C Equisetum pratense (Field horsetail & Shady horsetail)," for instance.
Horsetail (Equisteum arvense and spp) is one of the plants that has lived on the planet Earth far longer than humankind.